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Looking for a delicious jelly that is naturally free of pectin? This is it! Red plum raspberry jelly is the perfect fruit combination for your morning toast, mixed into yogurt or spread on your pancakes.

Red Plum Raspberry Jelly {No Added Pectin!}

Looking for a delicious jelly that is naturally free of pectin? This is it! Red plum raspberry jelly is the perfect fruit combination for your morning toast, mixed into yogurt or spread on your pancakes.

Looking for a delicious jelly that is naturally free of pectin? This is it! Red plum raspberry jelly is the perfect fruit combination for your morning toast, mixed into yogurt or spread on your pancakes.I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again…I’m not very good at making jams and jellies. Even when I use the packs of pectin!

I have switched over to using gelatin to create my strawberry freezer jam, cherry jam, grape jelly and five minute peach jam. They turned out beautifully!

But I recently teamed up with Ball Brand to try one of their recipes. I had the great pleasure of perusing The All New Ball Book Of Canning And Preserving. It’s like a canner’s dream.

The pictures are gorgeous. And the recipes all sound so delicious. I wish I had time to try them all!

But I had to just pick one to try and share with you.

Looking for a delicious jelly that is naturally free of pectin? This is it! Red plum raspberry jelly is the perfect fruit combination for your morning toast, mixed into yogurt or spread on your pancakes.

Trying My Hand At Jelly Again

With our allergies I don’t use pectin. Since I can’t be certain of the source it’s too risky. I know a lot of pectin is made from apples. And my two youngest are allergic to apples.

So instead of modifying a recipe I went for one that didn’t even need pectin. Red plum raspberry jelly sounded like the perfect combination of fruit flavors. And it is!

Neither fruit over powers the other.

There is no doubt that red plum raspberry jelly tastes good. You can use it for your  morning eggs and toast or mixed into some plain yogurt. We like it on pancakes.

Looking for a delicious jelly that is naturally free of pectin? This is it! Red plum raspberry jelly is the perfect fruit combination for your morning toast, mixed into yogurt or spread on your pancakes.

The Outcome

The real question, though, is did I manage to make good jelly without using gelatin?

Ummmm, no.

I read the instructions on how to look for the gelling point. I used a thermometer to monitor the temperature (got it to 220 just like it said).

But the timing worked out that it was right around the gelling point when I was trying to get my toddler down for a nap. And of course this was the one day where she was fighting sleep. In fact, instead of taking 3-10 minutes to get her to sleep it took over an hour and a half (including a dirty diaper change)! Maybe it was all those raspberries she ate!

Looking for a delicious jelly that is naturally free of pectin? This is it! Red plum raspberry jelly is the perfect fruit combination for your morning toast, mixed into yogurt or spread on your pancakes.

So I kept bouncing back and forth between checking the jelly and checking the toddler. And at one point I just said I have to get it done and said a prayer. Well, it wasn’t gelled.

My Big Mistake

And now that I am re-reading the directions I see that it says to stir constantly…oops. Not easy when trying to get a toddler to nap. I think all of the pectin came to the top when I wasn’t stirring…there was a sticky, pink foam. Oops.

Note – keep stirring while it boils!!

All is not lost, though. We now have sweet red plum raspberry syrup! I can’t wait to use it on our pancakes this week (every Friday we have breakfast for dinner…pancakes is on the menu).

I might also try cooking it down a bit or adding a little gelatin when I open a jar. Just to see what happens.

It’s Your Turn

In spite of my inability to make jams and jellies I am sharing this delicious recipe with you today. I bet you’ll have better luck. Maybe you can teach me a thing or two about gel! My motto moving forward is going to be “Follow the directions and keep stirring.”

I hope to try this recipe again and actually cook it the right way. I REALLY want to try red plum raspberry jelly on bread (freshly baked sourdough would heavenly).

How about you? Are you a pro at making jams and jellies? Or are you jelly challenged like me?

I’d love to hear how it goes if you try red plum raspberry jelly.

But there’s more! Keep reading.
Looking for a delicious jelly that is naturally free of pectin? This is it! Red plum raspberry jelly is the perfect fruit combination for your morning toast, mixed into yogurt or spread on your pancakes.

Red Plum Raspberry Jelly
Yields 4
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Ingredients
  1. 2 lbs. firm, ripe red plums, halved
  2. 1 cup water
  3. 4 cups raspberries
  4. 3 cups cane sugar
  5. cheesecloth
Instructions
  1. Pit plums, reserving pits. Chop plums and place in a 6 qt. stainless steel or enameled Dutch oven. Lightly crush the plum with a potato masher.
  2. Stir in the water and reserved pits. Bring to a boil, reduce heat, cover and simmer 10 minutes.
  3. Add raspberries, crushing with a potato masher. Return to a boil, cover, reduce heat and simmer 10 minutes.
  4. Line a large, fine wire mesh strainer with 3 layers of dampened cheesecloth. Place the strainer over a large bowl.
  5. Pour the plum mixture into the strainer (do not press down). Cover and let stand 3 hours or until collected juice measures 3 1/2 cups and mixture no longer drips.
  6. Wash and dry Dutch oven.
  7. Pour the juice into the Dutch oven. Stir in the sugar and bring to a boil over high heat. Boil, stirring constantly, to gelling point.
  8. Ladle hot jelly into a hot jar, leaving 1/4-inch headspace.
  9. Wipe jar rim. Center lid on jar. Apply band and adjust to fingertip tight.
  10. Place jar in boiling water canner. Repeat until all jars are filled.
  11. Process jars 10 minutes, adjusting for altitude. Turn off heat, remove lid and let jars stand 5 minutes.
  12. Remove jars from canner and cool.
Notes
  1. Tip - plum pits are super high in pectin, so simmering them with the fruit really helps give this jelly its velvety smooth set.
Just Take A Bite http://justtakeabite.com/

Looking for a delicious jelly that is naturally free of pectin? This is it! Red plum raspberry jelly is the perfect fruit combination for your morning toast, mixed into yogurt or spread on your pancakes.Can It Forward

Don’t forget to “Can It Forward” with Ball Brand. On July 22, 2016 they are hosting a Can-It-Forward day live on Facebook. You’ll see demos (I think I need to tune in for one on jelly). Plus Ball Brand will be donating to a local charity. The more engagement they receive the more they donate!

Here’s how you can participate.

  • Pledge to can-it-forward by signing up via the pledge page and share with friends.
  • Tune in on July 22nd to watch canning demonstrations via Facebook Live from 10:00AM – 3:30PM ET. Each hour, viewers will have the chance to win a giveaway prize!
  • If you engage with any of the Facebook Live recipe videos, a donation will be made to charity.
  • You can ask Jarden Home Brands canning experts any preserving or home canning questions via Twitter with the hashtag #canitforward from 10AM – 5PM ET on July 22nd. Consumers can also share their own #canitforward creations with the brand on Pinterest and Instagram.

More For You

Ball Brand would also like to give one of my lucky readers coupons for canning supplies and a copy of The All New Ball Book Of Canning And Preserving! Enter below for your chance to win.
a Rafflecopter giveaway

Does red plum raspberry jelly sound like a delicious combination? What is your favorite jelly flavor?

In order for me to support my blogging activities, I may receive monetary compensation or other types of remuneration for my endorsement, recommendation, testimonial and/or link to any products or services from this blog. It will not change the cost of any products or services for you.

The Busy Moms Solution to Preserving Pears | Just Take A Bite

The Busy Mom’s Solution to Preserving Pears

Fall is a busy time of canning applesauce and freezing pumpkin. But don’t forget about preserving pears! With a short season and a busy schedule use this guide to stock your pantry with pears before they are gone.

The Busy Moms Solution to Preserving Pears | Just Take A Bite

I try to do a fair amount of canning each fall. How much I do depends on my kids’ ages and how I’m feeling.

Regardless I don’t like to spend hours on end in the kitchen each day to keep up with produce preservation.

Do you have time?

I already take the easy route when it comes to canning peaches. That is a life saver.

Then I get to pears. There is really no way around it.

Canning pears takes a lot of time.

The Busy Moms Solution to Preserving Pears | Just Take A Bite

Lots of peeling and slicing (especially if the pears are small). It can take up to sixty pears just to do one round of canning! That is a lot of peeling.

So I haven’t done it in several years.

I would love to start canning pears again at some point. But while I have little kids and a busy schedule it just isn’t going to happen.

But I still want to preserve this amazing fruit to enjoy it all winter.

The Busy Moms Solution to Preserving Pears | Just Take A Bite

The solution.

Enter pearsauce.

It is just like applesauce but with pears. Honestly, I would take pearsauce any day over applesauce. It is that good.

There is no need to add any sweetener as pears are plenty sweet on their own.

The other thing you don’t have to do – peel them!

Preserving pears is quite easy when you can just wash, quarter, cook and puree. Then either can or freeze the pearsauce.

Use it in many ways.

One of the reasons I love having pearsauce on hand is that it makes a super easy first food for little ones six months and up. You can serve it plain or turn it into a nutrient dense baby porridge. Sign up for email alerts so you don’t miss when that is posted!

The Busy Moms Solution to Preserving Pears | Just Take A Bite

My big kids love it too! Sometimes I even make it extra special by adding strawberries, raspberries or blueberries from our freezer stash. As they melt and let off juice it colors the pearsauce and adds an extra burst of flavor.

Serve it cold. Serve it warm with a pinch of cinnamon. Add it to oatmeal. Mix it in yogurt.

You really can’t go wrong. You also don’t need to spend days on end making pearsauce.

Here is my busy mom’s solution to preserving pears. I worked through a half bushel in one day (with 3 young kids, including a nursing little one) and still managed to get my kids to and from school and activities and get healthy meals on the table.

That was from moving the pears to the sink to pulling the jars out of the canner…twice!

In fact it only took me twenty minutes to wash and slice the first batch of pears while helping my son with school work and feeding my youngest.

If I can do it you can too!

Have you ever tried preserving pears? I encourage you to try pearsauce!

Are you new to canning? Check out my step-by-step tutorial to get you going.

The Busy Moms Solution to Preserving Pears Fall is a busy time of canning applesauce and freezing pumpkin. But don't forget about preserving pears! Even busy moms can get the pantry stocked. | Just Take A Bite

Pearsauce: The Busy Mom's Solution To Preserving Pears
Yields 11
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Ingredients
  1. 35 - 40 pears
  2. 1 cup water
Instructions
  1. Wash pears.
  2. Quarter and core and place in a large stock pot with 1 cup water.
  3. Cook for 30 - 40 minutes, stirring periodically, until pears are cooked down and have released their juice.
  4. Puree the pears in a high powered blender or use an immersion blender.
To freeze
  1. Chill the pearsauce.
  2. Put the pearsauce in freezer safe containers.
  3. Label and freeze.
To can
  1. Return the pearsauce to the stockpot and keep warm.
  2. Prepare a water bath canner.
  3. Ladle pearsauce into hot jars.
  4. Place lid and band on the jars.
  5. Can in hot water bath for 25 minutes.
  6. Allow the jars to set untouched for at least 8 hours, until completely cool and sealed.
Notes
  1. One batch of pearsauce makes about 11 pints total. Since my canner holds 7 jars I do 4 quarts and 3 pints or 3 quarts and 4 pint with a little left over to eat fresh.
  2. A half bushel of pears will make two rounds of pearsauce with a few pears left for eating fresh or using for baking.
Just Take A Bite http://justtakeabite.com/

In order for me to support my blogging activities, I may receive monetary compensation or other types of remuneration for my endorsement, recommendation, testimonial and/or link to any products or services from this blog. It will not change the cost of any products or services for  you.

This post is linked to Savoring Saturdays.

In order for me to support my blogging activities, I may receive monetary compensation or other types of remuneration for my endorsement, recommendation, testimonial and/or link to any products or services from this blog. It will not change the cost of any products or services for you.

The Easiest Way to Can Peaches | Homemade Dutch Apple Pie

The Easiest Way to Can Peaches: A Step-by-step Tutorial

Want to know the easiest way to can peaches? It’s all about one key step. Follow this simple step-by-step tutorial to preserve one of summer’s gems so you can enjoy peaches year round.

The Easiest Way to Can Peaches | Homemade Dutch Apple Pie

The first time I canned peaches I was overwhelmed. There was so much work involved.

I was not new to canning. I didn’t have three kids yet. No big deal.

I had purchased a half bushel of peaches assuming that would be a good starting point. I ended up doing one round of canned peaches and freezing the rest. After peeling, pitting, chopping and canning one batch I gave up and just figured canned peaches would not be on my list of to-dos again for many…many years.

Then my mother-in-law told me a trick that changed everything.

Do NOT peel your peaches!

Of course this makes canning peaches about ten times easier. But it also preserves the sweetness and flavor of the peaches.

There is no need to worry about having to eat the skin either. It comes right off when you are ready to eat the peaches.

I have now successfully canned many…many quarts of peaches! Instead of being the hardest canning task it is about the easiest one I do all year.

I try to buy a half bushel every summer and can twenty one quarts of peaches, with a few left over for baking and eating.

Have you ever wanted to try canning peaches but it seems like a daunting task? I promise you it is not.

Grab a few peaches before they are gone for the summer and preserve them to enjoy all winter.

No more spending hours in the kitchen. This is the easiest way to can peaches. This summer I canned twenty one quarts in ONE day! With three young children, one nursing frequently. If I can do it anyone can!

The Easiest Way to Can Peaches | Homemade Dutch Apple Pie

One round of canning:

One half bushel of peaches = 3 rounds of canning (21 quarts) plus a few extra peaches for eating fresh

The Easiest Way to Can Peaches

The Easiest Way to Can Peaches | Homemade Dutch Apple Pie

  1. Let the peaches sit in a single layer until they are ripe but still slightly firm.The Easiest Way to Can Peaches | Homemade Dutch Apple Pie
  2. Prepare the simple syrup: Heat water and sugar in a large pot until sugar is dissolved. The syrup needs to be warm/hot when ready to can. You can prepare the syrup up to a few days in advance and just warm it before canning.
  3. Fill the canner with water and place the clean, quart jars inside. Put the lid on. Turn on the stove to high heat and let the water heat up until small bubbles appear. Maintain this low simmer and allow the jars to heat for ten minutes.The Easiest Way to Can Peaches | Homemade Dutch Apple Pie
  4. Wash the peaches well. This is important since you are keeping the skins on.The Easiest Way to Can Peaches | Homemade Dutch Apple Pie
  5. Fill a large bowl 2/3 full of water. Add 1/4 cup of lemon juice.
  6. Cut the peaches in half. Twist. Remove the pit. Quarter the peaches and place in the bowl of lemon water. Continue until all of the peaches are quartered.The Easiest Way to Can Peaches | Homemade Dutch Apple Pie
  7. Remove the jars from the hot water.
  8. Fill the hot jars with the peaches, skin side up if possible.The Easiest Way to Can Peaches | Homemade Dutch Apple Pie
  9. When all of the jars are full ladel the hot syrup into the jars, leaving 1 – 1 1/2 inches of space at the top of the jar.The Easiest Way to Can Peaches | Homemade Dutch Apple Pie
  10. Wipe the jar rims. Place a lid on and secure a band around the lid.
  11. Place all of the jars back in the canner. Put the lid on. Return to a boil.The Easiest Way to Can Peaches | Homemade Dutch Apple Pie
  12. Let the jars process for 30 minutes (25 minutes if doing pints).
  13. Turn off the heat. Remove the canner lid. Let sit for 5 minutes.The Easiest Way to Can Peaches | Homemade Dutch Apple Pie
  14. Remove the jars from the canner and place on a towel. Let the jars sit, untouched for at least 6 hours.
  15. When the jars are completely cool you can remove the bands, label the lids and store in your pantry.

In order for me to support my blogging activities, I may receive monetary compensation or other types of remuneration for my endorsement, recommendation, testimonial and/or link to any products or services from this blog.

In order for me to support my blogging activities, I may receive monetary compensation or other types of remuneration for my endorsement, recommendation, testimonial and/or link to any products or services from this blog. It will not change the cost of any products or services for you.

Cherry Jam

Cherry Jam -  Homemade Dutch Apple PieSweet cherries are abundant in the summer here in Michigan.  We love to go picking and then freeze a ton to use all year long (we got almost forty pounds this year!).

We also use a lot of them fresh.  Sweet cherries are great for making desserts and smoothies.

But another way to enjoy them is in jam.  Nothing beats fresh cherry jam!

This jam recipe is very easy to make.  Plus it’s free of pectin.  You can make a big batch and freeze most of it to use throughout the year.

One recipe makes about four 1/2-pint jars.  You can easily double the recipe so you have a lot to freeze.

Not sure you love cherries as much as I do? Swap some of the cherries for another fruit for a combination jam. Cherries and raspberries work very well together.

Cherries offer a perfect natural sweetness so you don’t need to add much to the jam.

Are you ready to start your day with a plate of scrambled eggs and toast with fresh cherry jam? I sure am! I think I could even eat the jam straight out of the jar. It’s that good.

Cherry Jam - Homemade Dutch Apple Pie

Cherry Jam
Yields 4
A simple and sweet homemade cherry jam that is free of pectin and fillers.
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Ingredients
  1. 2 Tbsp. lemon juice
  2. 2 Tbsp. pure cherry juice (can be replaced with more lemon juice)
  3. 3 tsp. grass-fed gelatin
  4. 4 cups sweet cherries, pitted and chopped (keep any juice that comes out from chopping with the cherries)
  5. 1/2 cup organic cane sugar, sucanat or coconut sugar
Instructions
  1. In a medium saucepan combine the lemon juice, cherry juice and gelatin. Let the gelatin dissolve for 3-4 minutes.
  2. Add the cherries and sugar to the pan.
  3. Cook and slightly mash cherries with a potato masher over medium heat until it comes to a boil.
  4. Turn down heat and allow jam to simmer for 2 minutes.
  5. Remove from heat and pour the jam into clean jars.
  6. Place lids on the jars and refrigerate until fully gelled.
  7. Store in the refrigerator or freezer.
Notes
  1. This recipe makes about 4 - 1/2 pint jars.
Just Take A Bite http://justtakeabite.com/

In order for me to support my blogging activities, I may receive monetary compensation or other types of remuneration for my endorsement, recommendation, testimonial and/or link to any products or services from this blog.

In order for me to support my blogging activities, I may receive monetary compensation or other types of remuneration for my endorsement, recommendation, testimonial and/or link to any products or services from this blog. It will not change the cost of any products or services for you.

This pectin free strawberry freezer jam is the easiest and most delicious jam you'll ever make. No pectin. Just simple, nutritious ingredients. It's a family favorite on toast, pancakes, waffles and oatmeal.

Pectin-Free Easy Strawberry Freezer Jam

Summer preservation just got a little easier.  This pectin-free easy strawberry freezer jam is the perfect way to use fresh strawberries.pectin-free easy strawberry freezer jam | Homemade Dutch Apple Pie

There are so many ways to use strawberries when they are fresh.  There are even plenty of ways to use them once they are frozen.  But one of the best ways to use them, fresh or frozen, is by making strawberry jam!

I’ll confess.  I’ve never been that great at making jam.

I followed recipes exactly.  I bought various types of pectin.  It just never seemed to turn out well.  I think my husband was starting to wonder if I would ever make jam that wasn’t like liquid or totally solid.

This year I decided to create my own recipe for pectin-free easy strawberry freezer jam.  It turned out so well!!

This pectin free strawberry freezer jam is the easiest and most delicious jam you'll ever make. No pectin. Just simple, nutritious ingredients. It's a family favorite on toast, pancakes, waffles and oatmeal.

I love this recipe because you don’t need pectin (the debate is still out on whether or not pectin is really that great for you).  Instead it uses grass-fed gelatin.  It is also super easy to make and only takes about 15 minutes.

This pectin-free strawberry freezer jam recipe makes about five half-pints of jam.  I just might have to make another batch soon.  I don’t think it’s going to last very long in our house.

Pectin-free easy strawberry freezer jam is great on toast.  But  you can also spread it on pancakes, mix it into yogurt or even use it as an ice cream topping!  My kids like to eat it by the spoonful.  It’s that good.

Whether you still have fresh strawberries available or you already have your stash in the freezer, try making pectin-free easy strawberry freezer jam.

You’ll have a little taste of summer ready in your freezer all year long.pectin-free easy strawberry freezer jam | Homemade Dutch Apple Pie

Pectin-Free Easy Strawberry Freezer Jam
A simple jam that comes together in minutes and is free of pectin.
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Ingredients
  1. 1/4 cup lemon juice
  2. 3 1/2 tsp. grass-fed gelatin
  3. 3/4 cups organic cane sugar, sucanat, coconut sugar or honey
  4. 5 cups strawberries (fresh or frozen)
Instructions
  1. In a medium sauce pan combine the lemon juice and gelatin. Let sit 2 minutes.
  2. Add the sweetener and strawberries.
  3. Cook over medium heat, stirring and mashing berries with a potato masher, for about 10 minutes.
  4. Pour the jam into half-pint jars.
  5. Chill jam in the refrigerator until set.
  6. Use the jam fresh or freeze until ready to use.
Notes
  1. This makes about five half-pints.
  2. If using frozen berries, thaw them at least partially before making the jam.
Just Take A Bite http://justtakeabite.com/

In order for me to support my blogging activities, I may receive monetary compensation or other types of remuneration for my endorsement, recommendation, testimonial and/or link to any products or services from this blog. It will not change the cost of any products or services for you.

Step-By-Step Canning (Applesauce)

I have been canning for about nine years now.  I am by no means an expert.  But I usually manage to stock our pantry with plenty of good stuff to last the winter.
Recently I’ve had a lot of people asking me about canning.  Although it may sound hard, it is actually quite simple.  Making the food to can is the hard part.  The canning is the easy part.
But I know when I was just learning it was a very daunting task.  And it does take a little practice to feel comfortable doing it.  So for any beginner canner or simply someone that needs a refresher, here is a step-by step guide to canning.
This is how I can.  I’m sure other people have their own methods/steps for things.  But this has always worked for me.  I think in my nine years of canning I’ve only ever had one or two jars that didn’t seal.  Not too bad.
This tutorial is for water bath canning.  Only certain foods can be canned with this method.  Some foods require a pressure canner.  I’ve only ever done that twice.  And it still scares me.  But maybe some day I’ll get better at it and post a tutorial on that as well.  Canning season just ended for me.  So it won’t be this year.

Read through the steps, get all of your supplies, take it slowly…and enjoy the canning process.  And enjoy all of your home canned goods that will fill your shelves.
Step 1. Prepare the food you want to can.  It should be warm when you are ready to can.  So reheat the food if you prepared it in advance.

Step 2. Fill the canner with water about 2/3 full.

Step 3. Place the canner on the stove and the rack in the canner.  Put clean jars in the rack.  The jars should be submerged in the water/have water inside them.

Step 4. Put the lid on the canner and turn on the heat.  The jars will need to sit in hot water for at least 5 minutes before they are ready to use.

Step 5. Place the lids in a small pan with water.  They should be submerged.  About 10 minutes before the jars are ready heat the pan until you can see tiny bubbles.   You don’t want to boil the lids.  Just get them warm enough so the glue is ready to stick to the jars.

Step 6. Make sure your food is ready and warm.

Step 7. Remove the lid from the canner.  You can see there are little bubbles all around the jars.  This tells you the jars are hot enough.

Step 8. Lift the rack from the canner so you can access the jars.

Step 9. Using tongs or a jar lifter carefully remove the jars from the hot water, emptying the water from the jars back into the canner.  Wipe the outsides of the jars and set them on a counter to be filled.  The canner should still be on the stove with the heat on.

Step 10. Use a canning funnel and fill the hot jars with the prepared food.  Most recipes suggest to fill the jars with one inch of space left.  But check the recipe to be sure.  I leave a little extra room when doing applesauce so it doesn’t overflow in the canner.

Step 11. Wipe the rims of the jars with a clean towel.

Step 12. Remove the lids from the small pan of water.  Wipe them dry with a clean towel.  Place a lid on each jar.  Tighten a ring around each lid.

Step 13. Place the filled and capped jars back in the canner rack.

Step 14. Move the rack to the bottom of the canner/submerge the jars.  The tops of the jars should be under the water.  If they are not add extra water to the canner.

Step 15. Put the lid on the canner.  When the water returns to a boil set a timer for the time specified in the recipe.

Step 16. When the time is up turn off the heat and remove the lid from the canner.  Set the timer for 5 minutes.

Step 17. When the 5 minutes is over pull the rack up.  Carefully remove the jars from the canner and place them on a clean towel on the counter.

Step 18.   Allow the jars to set, undisturbed for at least 8 hours.  Often you will hear the lids popping shortly after taking the jars out of the canner.  This is a good indicator that the jars have sealed.  But if you don’t hear the pop it does not mean they didn’t seal.

Step 19. When the jars are completely cool remove the bands.  Make sure the lids are sealed.  Label the jars and put in storage.

Step 20. Enjoy your pantry fulled of home canned goods all winter long!

Are you ready to try canning?  Here are some recipes I’ve made:

Applesauce
Pearsauce
Spaghetti Sauce
Salsa
Peaches
Pears
Chili Sauce
Vegetable Soup Stock
Apple Butter
Blueberry Syrup
Cherry Jam
Dill Pickles

In order for me to support my blogging activities, I may receive monetary compensation or other types of remuneration for my endorsement, recommendation, testimonial and/or link to any products or services from this blog. It will not change the cost of any products or services for you.

Canned Chili Sauce

 This homemade canned chili sauce goes perfectly with roast beef and tastes so good you’ll want to eat it plain!

This is a recipe from my mother-in-law for canned chili sauce. It is a great way to use late August produce – tomatoes, peppers and onions.

The chili sauce can be served alongside roast beef or any cut of meat you like.  My kids even like to eat it plain or use it as a salsa substitute.

The great thing about this chili sauce is that it is a bit sweet instead of spicy. So my daughter that can’t handle spicy foods loves it.

I like to always have some in the pantry.

How about you? Do you like chili sauce? What do you use it for?

Canned Chili Sauce

4 qts. tomatoes, peeled, chopped
5 medium or 2 large onions, diced
2 green peppers, diced
1/2 bunch celery, diced
(1 medium zucchini, diced…my add in, optional)
1 1/2 Tbsp. salt
3/4 cup sugar
1 cup vinegar

Simmer all together for 3 hours.  Process in boiling water for 10 min.  Makes 5 – 6 pints.

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Canned Beans…

So I was finally going to can the beans we grew in our garden today.  I got my pressure canner out last night, reread the instructions, washed the jars.  I put the beans in the crockpot to cook all night so I could can them first thing in the morning.  And then Rebecca got sick.  So I can’t start any projects that can’t be immediately interrupted.  So I guess I’ll be freezing these beans.  I ended up cooking our cannellini beans and some organic northern beans (boughten).  It made a big batch…filled my 6qt. crockpot.  Not quite what I was hoping for.  Canned beans are much more convenient.  But it’s still better than having to buy beans all the time…cheaper and healthier 🙂  Hopefully some other time I’ll actually get to try canning beans.  I still have dry kidney beans and pinto beans to use up.  And just as a tutorial, I used my SIL’s method for cooking the beans.

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Pantry Inventory

I finally took the time this morning to take inventory of my pantry.  I know it’s not 100% accurate since we’ve already used some of the stuff I canned this fall.  But it’s close.  I’m still planning on doing more canning after the holidays.  But I’m done with the usual stuff…pears, apples, etc.  Although there is always more that could be done, I’m happy with how much I did this year.  Here is what we had last year.  Here’s what we have right now:

Spaghetti sauce: 8 qts., 9 pts.
Salsa: 9 pts.
Chili sauce: 1 pt.
Tomatoes: 2 pts.
Vegetable soup base: 1 pt. (from MIL)
Dill pickles: 6 pts.
Blueberry syrup (or jelly;): 2 pts.
Cherry jam: 5 1/2-pts.
Apple butter: 4 pts., 3 1/2-pts.
Pears: 4 qts., 2 pts.
Pearsacue: 4 qts., 19 pts.
Apple pearsauce: 1 qt., 5 pts.
Applesauce:
– chunky w/ sugar: 1 pt.
– chunky w/o sugar: 6 qts., 12 pts.
– chunky w/ cinnamon and sugar: 1 pt.
– smooth w/o sugar: 10 qts., 12 pts.
Peaches: 10 qts., 5 pts.

There is also lots of stuff in the freezer.  Most of that is up to date in the side bar.

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Pearsauce

I thought I had posted the pearsauce canning recipe last year, but I guess I didn’t. I just kind of mentioned it. I made pearsauce yesterday and today. I still have to can it (probably tomorrow), but figured I’d post the recipe now. I got a half bushel of Bartlett pears last week and figured out that there are about 80 pears in a half bushel.
Pearsauce

40 small – medium pears, peeled, cored and sliced
2 cups water

Cook pears in water in large pot until soft. Mash with potato masher for chunky pearsauce. Run through foodmill or blend in a blender for smooth pearsauce. Can in boiling water bath 20 min. for pints, 25 min. for quarts.

*I did a batch with 60 pears and 3 cups of water. I got 2 quarts and 5 pints out of it.

*If you want a real treat add a little strawberry puree to the pearsauce. We had some left from the strawberry cake I made so I did that. Wow, is that good! I just stirred a little into the sauce I was serving for dinner last night to try it out. I haven’t added it to a larger quantity.

In order for me to support my blogging activities, I may receive monetary compensation or other types of remuneration for my endorsement, recommendation, testimonial and/or link to any products or services from this blog. It will not change the cost of any products or services for you.