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There are so many diets and theories and opinions when it comes to health. I've experimented with many of them! As I celebrate another year of life I'm so excited to finally be able to find joy in nourishing my body.

How to Find Joy in Nourishing Your Body

There are so many diets and theories and opinions when it comes to health. I’ve experimented with many of them! As I celebrate another year of life I’m so excited to finally be able to find joy in nourishing my body.There are so many diets and theories and opinions when it comes to health. I've experimented with many of them! As I celebrate another year of life I'm so excited to finally be able to find joy in nourishing my body.

“You have to be healthy to eat healthy.”

It’s something I often say to people frustrated with trying to eat the “right way” but still not feeling great. There are so many diets that promote real food and healing. They all have merit, but that doesn’t mean they work for everyone.

I know this because I’ve tried them (read some of my thoughts HERE). And the only thing I got was severe obsessive compulsive disorder, anxiety, more food intolerances and infertility. But no healing.

The real problem is they all include rules. Specific diets place restrictions on what you can eat and categorize food as good or bad. When a food is deemed bad or forbidden guess what happens? You want it! You are left with this constant decision making between doing the right thing or the wrong thing. And feeling guilty if you choose wrong. Or worse food starts to cause anxiety.There are so many diets and theories and opinions when it comes to health. I've experimented with many of them! As I celebrate another year of life I'm so excited to finally be able to find joy in nourishing my body.

It took me the last twenty years to move past feeling like food is either good or bad. But I did it.  And I love it! It is so freeing to finally enjoy food.

Sound Familiar? There’s help!

Are you hung up on trying to find the right diet for you? Are you wondering if low carb or grain free or high fat is right for you? Does it make you stressed just thinking about it? Here are some simple tips to get past the fear and back to joy.

  1. Start listening to your body.
    Take note of how you feel when you eat certain foods. Keep a food journal for a week or two if need be. If nuts bother your stomach, take a break from them. If you feel better eating more carbohydrates and less fat then go for it. Eat what makes YOU feel good, not what helps your neighbor or your favorite blogger. If you are dealing with an autoimmune disease or allergies that will impact what foods hurt or help.
  2. Get rid of the rules.
    Stop viewing food as good or bad. As long as it’s real food it’s ok. Enjoy a piece of homemade chocolate cake and ice cream. Make a big stack of pancakes with butter and real maple syrup for breakfast. When you restrict foods because you think you shouldn’t eat them (instead of restricting because they actually make you feel bad) they create more stress. Ditch the diet and rigid rules.
  3. Start focusing on nourishment.
    This is where the fun begins. When you let go of unnecessary rules and you’re not constantly debating between eating a salad and digging into a container of ice cream you can focus on really taking care of your body.

Finding Joy

I spent far too many years trying to eat the perfect diet. Only to feel stressed, anxious and deprived. Then I had to go the other direction of eating anything and everything to try to restore metabolic health (you can read about my journey HERE and HERE). All to find a place of balance. Now I find great joy in nourishing my body. Not because a diet tells me to. Because I want to.

I heard someone recently say that happiness is external and joy is internal. Being happy comes from your circumstances, but joy is a state of being that comes from within. And it’s true. Good food does make me happy. But it’s the joy and peace I have inside that motivates me to make healthy choices every day.There are so many diets and theories and opinions when it comes to health. I've experimented with many of them! As I celebrate another year of life I'm so excited to finally be able to find joy in nourishing my body.

Balance is Key

Today eating is like an exciting adventure for me. I try to pack as many nutrients into my food as possible. I add desiccated liver and fermented kale to smoothies and salads. I eat sardines and anchovies a couple times a week. I eat pastured meats and eggs regularly. I aim for a rainbow of vegetables and plenty of healthy fats daily. I drink herbal teas for added minerals and to support my body and get my hormones back in balance. It’s almost like a fun game to see how many vitamins and minerals I can get each day. I feel good and the joy comes pouring out.

But I also enjoy a dish of ice cream when I want it. Sometimes I eat a bowl of mashed avocado and tortilla chips for breakfast (quick and delicious…and it’s easy to add liver to avocado!). I like to bake with my kids and make special sweet treats together (like gluten free Oreos® and salted honey chocolates). It’s even rare that I go a day without at least a little bit of chocolate.There are so many diets and theories and opinions when it comes to health. I've experimented with many of them! As I celebrate another year of life I'm so excited to finally be able to find joy in nourishing my body.

There is no more should or shouldn’t with food. There are no rules. There is no restriction. Which in turn eliminates cravings (imagine that!).

Now I love to fuel my body, and I love how it makes me feel. That does not mean my diet is perfect. Not every single bite of food has to be nutrient packed. And less healthy foods here and there don’t negate all the good stuff I put in my body every day.

Let go of the Guilt

There is no guilt or feeling of reward for eating a certain way. I just truly love to eat nutrient dense food. No rules or special diets. I don’t eat GAPS or Paleo or AIP or low carb or any other specialized diet. I just eat real food that makes me feel good and that I know is helping me take care of my body. One day I might eat grain free while the next I might need some extra starch. And they are both just fine!

It’s very freeing to let go and find joy in nourishment. And it’s the healthiest I’ve ever been!

I am very blessed that I do not have an autoimmune condition or severe allergies. But I do have some sensitivities and health issues I’m still working through. But I try not to let them get me down. I nourish my body as best I can with my limitations and keep striving for full healing.

Eating real food is easy. There are limitless options. Eating real food that meets your needs can be hard. But once you figure out how to do it you’ll love how you feel.There are so many diets and theories and opinions when it comes to health. I've experimented with many of them! As I celebrate another year of life I'm so excited to finally be able to find joy in nourishing my body.

Foods That Nourish

Some of my favorite nutrient dense foods are ferments. They are packed with natural probiotics. What I really love is how easy they are (take a big scoop and enjoy!) and how much my kids like them. My toddler can’t get enough sauerkraut. While we do make our own sometimes, I don’t always have time to pound cabbage.

I recently got the chance to try sauerkraut and fermented pickles from Cultured Guru.There are so many diets and theories and opinions when it comes to health. I've experimented with many of them! As I celebrate another year of life I'm so excited to finally be able to find joy in nourishing my body.

Both the kraut and pickles have just a few simple ingredients and taste amazing! Using traditional fermentation these products are teaming with probiotics. They make great additions to a meal or are the perfect quick snack.

My oldest can’t get enough of the pickles. She has oral SPD and doesn’t tolerate any amount of spice. So even though she likes pickles it’s rare we can find any she’ll eat. But she loves the Cultured Guru pickles! She loves the sauerkraut too. Another rarity for her.

If you want to try some Cultured Guru ferments you’re in luck! You can get 25% off off using coupon code PROBIO.

I’ll be stocking up too. My kids and I can’t get enough!! Such a blessing when working on healing allergies!There are so many diets and theories and opinions when it comes to health. I've experimented with many of them! As I celebrate another year of life I'm so excited to finally be able to find joy in nourishing my body.

Super Charged Bites

Another super food that tops my list is a traditional staple – organ meats. I get mine by adding Perfect Supplements desiccated liver to just about everything. I even make caramel with it! I also love the fermented kale, collagen and aquatic greens from Perfect Supplements. I add them to most of our smoothies.

You can get 10% off any of these Perfect Supplements products with the coupon code TAKE10.

Some of my other favorite foods include sardines, salmon, eggs, raw milk, butter, lard, tallow, pastured meats and a rainbow of vegetables. They all make my body smile.

You have to be healthy to eat healthy.

I’m so excited to finally be healthy so I can enjoy eating well and nourishing my body every day.

Are you ready to let go of rules and enjoy eating again? Ditch the diets and find joy in nourishing your body.

Today is my birthday, and I’m starting it with pure joy. Joy that I’m taking care of myself and this beautiful body God gave me.

Want to see what I eat for my #nourishingbreakfast #nourishinglunch and #nourishingdinner? Follow me on Instagram! It may inspire you…or it might gross you out. In my husband’s words, “You eat that for breakfast?!”There are so many diets and theories and opinions when it comes to health. I've experimented with many of them! As I celebrate another year of life I'm so excited to finally be able to find joy in nourishing my body.

Disclaimer: I am working with Cultured Guru for this post. I have been compensated for my time but all opinions are my own.

In order for me to support my blogging activities, I may receive monetary compensation or other types of remuneration for my endorsement, recommendation, testimonial and/or link to any products or services from this blog. It will not change the cost of any products or services for you.

Honey Sourdough Soft Pretzels With Bacon Cheddar Cheese Sauce

Honey Sourdough Soft Pretzels with Bacon Cheddar Cheese SauceA few months ago I re-introduced wheat into our diets in the form of traditionally prepared sourdough.  So far it’s going very well.  It is the only wheat we eat.  Since it is fermented most of the gluten is broken down.  I also use spelt since it is a milder form of wheat.

Since then I’ve been making a variety of sourdough goodies.  Of course I make plenty of bread.  But I also make fun food like these soft pretzels.

My kids and my husband really enjoyed these – especially with a delicious bacon cheese sauce!Honey Sourdough Soft Pretzels with Bacon Cheddar Cheese Sauce | Homemade Dutch Apple Pie

Sourdough pretzels are super easy to make.  The dough is very easy to work with.

The pretzels are also very filling.  You can turn them into a simple Sunday night dinner by paring the pretzels and cheese with a salad (topped with a little protein and homemade dressing with healthy fat).  You’ll get a good balance of protein, carbohydrates and fat.

Need a treat while watching sports?  Sourdough soft pretzels are perfect!  You can make mini ones for munching like appetizers.  Or you can really feel like you’re at the game by indulging in some giant pretzels like you’d get at a concession stand (minus the neon cheese and chemicals).Honey Sourdough Soft Pretzels with Bacon Cheddar Cheese Sauce | Homemade Dutch Apple Pie

These would also be great for a kid’s birthday party.  Mini soft pretzels with little cheese cups for dipping.

Honey sourdough soft pretzels with bacon cheddar cheese sauce are fun for kids and adults.  Plus they are properly prepared and don’t contain any unhealthy ingredients. Honey Sourdough Soft Pretzels with Bacon Cheddar Cheese Sauce | Homemade Dutch Apple Pie

Honey Sourdough Soft Pretzels with Bacon Cheddar Cheese Sauce
Yields 10
A traditional sourdough soft pretzel with bacon cheese dipping sauce.
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Bagels
  1. 2 cups sourdough starter
  2. 3 3/4 cups spelt flour (or kamut, einkorn, whole wheat or rye)
  3. 1/2 Tbsp. sea salt
  4. 1/3 cup cold water
  5. 3 Tbsp. honey
  6. sea salt for topping
Bacon Cheese Sauce
  1. 1 Tbsp. arrowroot or tapioca flour
  2. 1 Tbsp. bacon grease
  3. 1/2 cup milk
  4. 1/2 cup grated cheddar cheese
  5. 1/4 cup cooked, crumbled bacon (optional)
  6. salt and pepper to taste
Bagels
  1. In the bowl of a stand mixer combine the starter, salt, water and honey. Gently mix with a wooden spoon until the salt and honey dissolve.
  2. Add the flour. Mix with the dough hook for 15 minutes.
  3. Remove the dough from the mixer.
  4. Divide it into 10 - 12 equal portions.
  5. Roll the each piece of dough into a long snake and shape it into a pretzel.
  6. Place the pretzels on a greased or parchment lined baking sheet.
  7. Cover and let rise 6-12 hours.
  8. Bake at 350*F for 35 - 40 minutes.
  9. Brush with butter, oil or water and sprinkle on sea salt if desired.
  10. Store unused bagels in a sealed container at room temperature or in the freezer.
Bacon Cheese Sauce
  1. Cook and crumble bacon in advance if you want bacon pieces in your sauce. Reserve the bacon grease.
  2. In a small sauce pan combine the arrowroot and bacon grease. Heat over medium heat until the grease is melted and they combined.
  3. Slowly add the milk, whisking constantly.
  4. Continue to whisk until the milk heats and gets to the point it is about to boil.
  5. Reduce heat and add cheese. Whisk until the cheese is melted and combined into the sauce.
  6. Season with salt and pepper to taste.
  7. Add crumbled bacon if desired.
Notes
  1. If you want the bagel a bit sweeter you can add an extra 1-2 Tbsp. of honey or cane sugar.
  2. Any type of cheese that melts well can be used in place of cheddar.
Just Take A Bite http://justtakeabite.com/

In order for me to support my blogging activities, I may receive monetary compensation or other types of remuneration for my endorsement, recommendation, testimonial and/or link to any products or services from this blog. It will not change the cost of any products or services for you.

Homemade Quinoa Milk {Nursing Mother’s Drink}

Homemade quinoa milk is a delicious alternative to dairy that is also great for nursing mothers boost milk supply.

Quinoa Milk Nursing Mother's Drink | Homemade Dutch Apple PieHave you ever tried quinoa milk?  Despite the growing variety of alternative milks available, it is not something I’ve ever seen at the store (though I have seen one brand of it online).

As I mentioned in my oat milk post I’m not a huge fan of nut milks.  Especially for young kids and nursing moms.

My first choice is always fresh, raw milk from cows or goats.  Unfortunately a dairy intolerance is very common for small babies.  Which  means mom needs an alternative.

Coconut milk is a great choice for cooking, baking and adding a splash to tea.  But it’s not something most people will drink plain in large quantities.  Plus it can also be hard on babies since it can be gassy and even cause reflux.

Enter quinoa milk!  It has a very mild flavor – similar to rice milk.  It is also very easy to make and very cost effective.  One quarter cup of quinoa can make up to six cups of milk!

The best thing about quinoa milk is that it is great for boosting milk supply.   If you tolerate quinoa and are a nursing mother I encourage you to include quinoa in your diet.  Even if you can have dairy this is a great alternative milk to have in your diet for variety and nutrition.

Unlike other alternative milks quinoa milk has quite a bit of protein.  You can add both calcium and vitamin D when you make it to boost nutrition even more.

Quinoa milk is not heavy like nut milks.  It has a very neutral flavor.  It works well for cooking and baking.  Plus it is great for boosting milk supply!

Need some variety in your diet?  Or are you just looking for an alternative to dairy?  Give quinoa milk a try. Quinoa Milk Nursing Mother's Drink | Homemade Dutch Apple Pie

Homemade Quinoa Milk: Nursing Mother's Drink {fermented option}
A delicious alternative drink that helps boost milk supply.
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Ingredients
  1. 1/4 cup quinoa
  2. 2 tsp. lemon juice
  3. warm water
  4. 5 cups water
  5. 2 Tbsp. coconut sugar, cane sugar, honey or maple syrup OR 3 dates (optional)
  6. 1/2 tsp. sea salt (optional)
  7. Vitamin D drops (optional)
  8. calcium powder (optional)
  9. 2 Tbsp. whey (optional)
Instructions
  1. Place the quinoa and lemon juice in a bowl. Cover with warm water (quantity does not matter, as long as it's covered)
  2. Let soak for 24 hours.
  3. Drain and rinse the quinoa.
  4. Combine the quinoa and 5 cups water in a medium saucepan.
  5. Bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer, covered, for 2 hours.
  6. If using dates as a sweetener add them to the pan during the last 30 minutes of cooking.
  7. Pour the quinoa and water into a blender.
  8. Blend until smooth.
Non-fermented method
  1. Add sweetener (if desired/if not using dates) and sea salt. Blend.
  2. Pour into a serving container.
  3. Add vitamin D and calcium if desired.
  4. Refrigerate.
  5. Shake before serving.
Fermented Method
  1. Pour the blended mixture into a container.
  2. Add salt and whey.
  3. Cover and let sit at room temperature for 3 days.
  4. Add sweetener and vitamin D/calcium and refrigerate.
  5. Shake before serving.
Notes
  1. You can add 1 tsp. of pure vanilla to the pureed mixture for vanilla quinoa milk.
  2. If the milk is too thick for your taste it can be diluted with extra water or it can be strained.
  3. This should not be used for children under one year of age.
  4. This makes a great dairy alternative for both kids and adults.
  5. This recipe can easily be doubled.
  6. This recipe makes about 5 cups of milk. It can be increased by adding extra water.
Just Take A Bite http://justtakeabite.com/
This post is linked to Savoring Saturdays.

In order for me to support my blogging activities, I may receive monetary compensation or other types of remuneration for my endorsement, recommendation, testimonial and/or link to any products or services from this blog. It will not change the cost of any products or services for you.

Soaked Bread

Yes, it is another soaked grain recipe from my Kitchen Stewardship e-book 🙂  This bread recipe comes from Kelly the Kitchen Kop (a fellow West MI blogger and WAPF chapter board member!).  I’ve done quite a bit of experimenting with bread making over the last few years.  Some hits.  Some big misses.  Considering I still haven’t perfected regular bread baking I wasn’t sure what would happen with a soaked version.  Would it taste good?  Would the texture be ok?  Well, I’m glad I gave this a try.  It’s great!!  And it was super easy to make.  As usual I scaled the recipe back to only make one loaf on my first attempt (I hate to make a big batch and then not have it turn out).  I wish I would have made the full recipe now 😛  I don’t think this loaf will last long now that I can eat it 🙂  This bread is super soft and has great flavor.  All three of us really enjoyed it with our soup last night.  And I had some for breakfast today.  Tastes great toasted with butter or nut butter.

This recipe does use some AP flour.  I’m starting to think it’s pretty tough to make a really good loaf of bread without a little AP flour.  I still like to use mostly freshly ground whole wheat.  But just a little bit of organic AP flour really does wonders for the texture.

I really like that you can freeze this bread at the dough stage.  Then you can have freshly baked bread ready in no time.  I’ll have to try that the next time I make this…which might be very soon 🙂  Kelly’s recipe suggests using a Bosch mixer.  I used my Kitchen Aid.  It worked just fine.

My timing on this wasn’t the best since it was ready to be baked right at nap time.  So I stuck it in the oven and started walking with Abram.  When it was done I was able to get it out of the oven with him still asleep in the Moby.  But I couldn’t take it out of the pan right away.  It did get a little soft having to sit in the pan.  But I just stuck the loaf back in the oven (not in the pan) for a few min. and it firmed back up.

Soaked Bread
makes 3 loaves

4 cups whole wheat flour

1 1/2 cups spelt (or you can just use more whole wheat) (I used whole wheat)
3/4 cups buttermilk (you could also use whole milk yogurt, or kefir. or use an equal
amount of water + 1 T. lemon juice, whey or vinegar) (I used yogurt)
2 cups very warm water
1 egg (when I did 1/3 of the recipe I just used the white of one egg…kept the yolk to use in our lunch 🙂
3 cups Bob’s Red Mill white unbleached flour
1/4 cup warm/hot water
1/4 cup coconut oil
2 1/2 Tbsp. yeast
1/2 cup local raw honey
1 Tbsp. sea salt

The night before, add wheat and spelt flour, buttermilk, and water to your Bosch Kitchen Mixer. Mix just until all the flour is wet. Put the lid on the Bosch, and let set at least 7 hours but 12 or more is even better and you may even have a nice sourdough taste.

The next day, or whenever you’re ready to finish your bread, add the egg and white flour to the Bosch. Measure a 1/4 c. hot water in a measuring cup…don’t put it in yet…but add to the hot water (so it melts) 1/4 c refined or unrefined coconut oil. (If it’s warm in your kitchen and the oil is already melted just add these two ingredients.)  Once it’s melted, add it in, and start mixing on the lowest speed.

Add yeast, keep mixing on lowest speed. Add honey and seal salt.

When the dough has cleaned up the sides and middle of the bowl, check how the dough feels and see if you need a bit more water or flour (you’ll know if it feels too dry or wet), and then set the timer for 14 minutes and continue mixing on the lowest speed.

Meanwhile, butter your bread pans. (Butter up and over the lip of the bread pan, so it will come out easily after baking.) When the dough is done, use buttered hands to split it into 3 equal pieces (some weigh it out, but I just guess), shape them into a loaf, and press into the pans. Be careful not to fold it over itself and leave big air pockets.

————————————————————

VARIATION FOR FREEZING THE DOUGH:

At this point you could shape the dough to fit in your pan (or shape into buns to use in the fugure), then freeze before letting it rise.  When it’s frozen, transfer it to a freezer baggie.  Now you have homeade bread all ready to thaw, rise adn bake someday when you feel like fresh-baked heaven right from the oven.  Or keep reading if you plan to bake them all at once and then freeze.

————————————————————-
The rise time depends on the temp in your kitchen – usually 2-3 hours.  When it’s the height you want (don’t wait too long or it will fall), carefully place the bread pans into a cool oven (if it is electric) and set it for 350 degrees.  Bake 25 min.  For a gas oven preheat to 350 and bake for 20 min.

When you take it out of the oven, immediately (carefully) take it out of the pan and cool on a wire rack, otherwise condensation builds up in the pan and makes the bread soggy.

In order for me to support my blogging activities, I may receive monetary compensation or other types of remuneration for my endorsement, recommendation, testimonial and/or link to any products or services from this blog. It will not change the cost of any products or services for you.

Soaked Whole Wheat Biscuits

I recently downloaded the soaking grains e-book from Kitchen Stewardship.  Tons of great recipes.  And it’s free!  This week I tried Katie’s biscuit recipe.  It is super easy.  And I was pleasantly surprised with how they turned out.  Not exactly like a biscuit you might be used to.  But not far off.  And very good!  I’ve been enjoying them all week.  It’s nice to have some bread in the house that I can experiment with that I know is properly prepared.  We all enjoyed these biscuits (with lots of butter 🙂 with a big bowl of soup.  And they are great toasted with butter or nut butter.  These hardly require any hands on time.  Perfect for a busy mom 🙂

Soaked Whole Wheat Biscuits

2 c. flour
3 tsp. baking powder
½ tsp. salt
¼ cup butter or coconut oil or lard
¾-1 cup buttermilk or yogurt

Cut fat into flour and mix with cultured buttermilk or yogurt. Leave on counter overnight (be sure it’s covered so it doesn’t dry out).  Sprinkle the baking powder and salt over the top and fold in as thoroughly as possible yet with as few strokes as possible. The key to flaky biscuits is less handling.  Roll out approximately 1 inch thick and cut with a glass dipped in flour (or you can make rounds by hand).

Bake at 425 degrees on ungreased baking sheet or stone for 13-15 minutes (parchment paper works great).

In order for me to support my blogging activities, I may receive monetary compensation or other types of remuneration for my endorsement, recommendation, testimonial and/or link to any products or services from this blog. It will not change the cost of any products or services for you.

Soaked Whole Wheat Muffins

I had some buttermilk to use up, so I looked in my Nourishing Traditions cookbook for a recipe.  I came across the Basic Muffin Recipe.  A super simple soaked muffin that you can make in just about any flavor you want.  I baked a batch of blueberry muffins this morning.  Very good!  And very easy.  Now that I’m hoping to try a small amount of grains soon, and since I’m trying to really get back on track with healthy eating for the whole family, I figured it was good to get back into the habit of soaking grains.  This is a great basic recipe.  I’ll use it again for sure.

Soaked Whole Wheat Muffins
makes 15-20

3 cups whole wheat flour
2 cups buttermilk, kefir or yogurt (I used half buttermilk and half yogurt)
2 eggs
1 tsp. salt
1/4 cup maple syrup
2 tsp. baking soda
1 tsp. vanilla extract
3 Tbsp. melted butter

Soak flour in buttermilk, kefir or yogurt in a warm place for 12-24 hours (muffins will rise better if soaked for 24 hours).  Blend in remaining ingredients.  Pour into well greased muffin tins (I used paper muffin cups) about 3/4 full.  Bake at 325 for 1 hour.

Variations:

Raisin – add 1/2 cup raisins and 1/2 tsp .cinnamon
Blueberry – add 1 cup fresh or frozen blueberries (do not add them to the batter, place them on top of the muffins after filling the tin so they don’t sink to the bottom)
Dried cherry – add 4 oz. dried cherries and 1/2 cup chopped crispy pecans
Fruit spice – add 2 ripe peeled, chopped pears or peaches, 1/2 tsp. cinnamon, 1/8 tsp. cloves, 1/8 tsp. nutmeg.
Lemon – add grated rind of 2 lemons and 1/2 cup chopped crispy pecans
Ginger – add 1 Tbsp. freshly grated ginger and 1 tsp. ground ginger.  Omit vanilla.

In order for me to support my blogging activities, I may receive monetary compensation or other types of remuneration for my endorsement, recommendation, testimonial and/or link to any products or services from this blog. It will not change the cost of any products or services for you.

Sour Cream (GAPS-legal)

I mentioned before that we started our cow share on Monday. So my dairy adventures continue this week. I made ice cream on Tuesday.  Yesterday I made sour cream.  I have read various methods on how to do it/what ingredients to use.  So I just started experimenting and using what I have on hand.  I used a little bit of cream that was left after making ice cream and some plain yogurt for the culture.  I was very happy to see that it thickened nicely and has great flavor.  I really enjoyed it in my soup this morning.  I’ll have to experiment with times and ratios.  I was just using a little leftover cream to give it a try this time.  I think I used about a pint of cream and a couple Tbsp. of yogurt.  It cultured for about 24 hours.  Now I understand why it was so hard to find a “recipe” for sour cream.  There isn’t really one.  Just mix cream with a live culture and let it sour in a warm place.  I’ll have to update this post when I figure out our ideal ratios.  But I’m thankful that my first attempt went well.  Maybe I’ll trying making it with kefir sometime to get even more good bacteria in it.  It was almost impossible to take a picture of it.  But you get the idea.  Today’s adventure…yogurt.  Post(s) to come 🙂  Homemade sour cream is allowed already on GAPS intro.  So this is a great dairy product to make right away when doing GAPS.

Sour Cream

Cream (preferably raw) (1 pt – 1 qt)
live culture (yogurt, kefir, buttermilk) (2-5 Tbsp.)

Mix cream and yogurt in a glass jar.  Cover and place in a warm, dark spot for about 24 hours to culture.  Transfer to the refrigerator.

In order for me to support my blogging activities, I may receive monetary compensation or other types of remuneration for my endorsement, recommendation, testimonial and/or link to any products or services from this blog. It will not change the cost of any products or services for you.

Ketchup

We eat quite a bit of ketchup.  I was making fermented ketchup for a while.  Then I got out of the habit when I got pregnant and couldn’t handle anything fermented.  Recently I saw a recipe for fermented ketchup on Nourished and Nurtured and thought I should get back into the habit and give a new recipe a try.  So I made this at the beginning of the week and let it set on the counter for a few days.  We gave it a try yesterday.  At first Rebecca said she liked it.  Then she seemed unsure.  It is good, but I think I will have to still modify it a bit more to our liking.  I did adjust as I was making it, so I didn’t follow the recipe 100%.  The thing I have a hard time with when making homemade ketchup is the texture.  Maybe I’ll try making it in the blender next time.  Yesterday I used my immersion blender on this batch.  It helped smooth it out a little, but it’s still thicker than boughten ketchup.  I think maybe I need a little more liquid and then I can blend it.  Anyway, I’m glad I tried it.  I’m glad we have a fermented condiment for dipping again.  I’ll have to keep experimenting.  But this is a good base recipe.  I’ll post the original recipe.  I didn’t make a full recipe.  Just enough to fit in one pint jar.  I’ll update later if I come up with some mods.

Fermented Ketchup

three 7-oz jars of tomato paste, preferably in glass jars to avoid BPA

1/4 cup plus 2 Tbsp. raw honey
3 Tbsp. raw apple cider vinegar
3 small garlic cloves, pressed (I just used garlic powder)
6 Tbsp. whey
2 1/4 tsp finely ground celtic sea salt
pinch cayenne pepper (I didn’t add this)

Combine all ingredients in a bowl (if using a quart mason jar, you can save on dirty dishes by mixing this up directly in the jar). Stir well to combine. If using pint mason jars, pour the ketchup into the jars.

Ensure that the top of the ketchup is at least 1-inch below the top of the jar(s).

Using a clean cloth or paper towel, wipe the top of the jar above the ketchup clean.

Put lid on jar and leave at room temperature for 3 days; then transfer to the refrigerator.

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Fermented Vegetables (GAPS-legal)

I finally got around to making some fermented veggies yesterday.  I followed the directions in the GAPS book.  It doesn’t give quantities, but it tells the method.  I used cabbage, beet and carrot.  GAPS also suggests cauliflower, but I’m avoiding that right now.  I hope I do ok with the carrot in this form.  It was super easy to do.  I made 3 quarts.  It takes about  week to ferment.  I’m anxious to try this when it’s done!  This is a great probiotic food that will aid in digestion.  The veggies and liquid should be added to your diet gradually because of the probiotics.

Fermented Vegetables
makes ~ 3 qts.

1/2 large green or red cabbage
2 large carrots
1 large beet root
cauliflower (I didn’t use this)
salt
garlic (I just added some garlic powder)
3/4 cup kefir whey
water

Chop veggies into bite size pieces or shreds.  Season with salt to taste.  Add chopped garlic or garlic powder.  Mix.  Distribute evenly between 3 wide mouth quart jars.  Add 1/4 cup whey to each jar.  Fill with water so that all of the veggies are submerged.  Seal jar.  Let ferment on the counter for 1 week before transferring to the refrigerator.

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GAPS Sauerkraut

Aside from bone broth one of the most nourishing and healing foods for GAPS is sauerkraut.  It is recommended right from the start…starting with just the juice and then adding in the vegetable itself.  So I figured I better try some 🙂  This recipe comes right from the GAPS book.  Very simple.  And only takes 5-7 days to ferment.  I made mine even more simple since I didn’t have any carrots in the house…and they bother me anyway.  So it’s just cabbage, water and salt.  That’s it.  It does take a little elbow grease to get the cabbage broken down.  But still very easy to make.

I tried my first bite yesterday.  It was pretty good.  I only took one small bite…start slowly.  So I can’t say if it had any impact on me or not.  I’ll have to update again sometime.  And I probably should be starting with just the juice anyway 😛  As I’m getting more into the GAPS diet I’m realizing that for now I don’t need/can’t handle tons of veggies.  I always wanted to load up on them before…that’s how you get rid of constipation, right?  When in reality all of the fiber aggrivates your gut when it’s not healed/not able to digest properly.  And I think that’s why I’m finding so many veggies bother me.  Until I get my gut sealed and healed I need to stick to only food that is very easy to digest…like broth, very mushy veggies, probiotic foods, etc.  I can’t handle much fiber right now.  The opposite of what I was told for years.  No wonder I had so many problems!  Slowly but surely I’m figuring this out 🙂  My goal is to start having a little of the juice and/or the cabbage with most meals.  Hopefully that will help with digestion.

And not related to sauerkraut, but something else I’m finding…I think it may be the coconut flour that’s been bothering my tummy lately.  Same issue…too much fiber for me to handle right now.  Coconut flour is particularly high in fiber.  So sad.  Since it’s so good!!  But all in good time.  Until I’m doing better I’ll keep my grain free baked good intake to a minimum and stick with nut flours.  I handle those better at the moment.

Anyway, here’s the recipe.  I only made a small batch…one small head of cabbage.  It made 1 quart.

GAPS Sauerkraut

1 medium size white cabbage or combo of red and white cabbage
2 shredded carrots
water
1 – 2 Tbsp. unrefined sea salt

Slice cabbage thinly.  Add carrots.  Add salt.  Knead mixture well with your hands until a lot of juice comes out.  If it is not juicy enough add a little water.  Put the mixture in a glass jar for fermentation.  Make sure the cabbage is covered with liquid and that there is at least 1 inch of headspace in the jar.  Cover loosely with lid.  Let ferment in dark place for 5-7 days.  Check periodically to make sure the cabbage is submerged in liquid.

In order for me to support my blogging activities, I may receive monetary compensation or other types of remuneration for my endorsement, recommendation, testimonial and/or link to any products or services from this blog. It will not change the cost of any products or services for you.