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There is nothing quite like a hot bowl of oatmeal on a crisp fall day. Make it even better by turning it into apple crisp steel cut oatmeal with fresh apples and coconut sugar.

Apple Crisp Steel Cut Oatmeal

There is nothing quite like a hot bowl of oatmeal on a crisp fall day. Make it even better by turning it into apple crisp steel cut oatmeal with fresh apples and coconut sugar.

There is nothing quite like a hot bowl of oatmeal on a crisp fall day. Make it even better by turning it into apple crisp steel cut oatmeal with fresh apples and coconut sugar.

I am working with Bob’s Redmill and Stonyfield for this post. I have been compensated for my time commitment. But all opinions are my own.

I love the start of fall. The leaves are changing colors. There is a crispness to the air. And some of my absolute favorite produce is in season – squash, pumpkin, pears and apples!

There are so many ways to use apples, including canning homemade applesauce and turning them into sweet, cinnamony apple crisp (with homemade vanilla ice cream of course!)

There is nothing quite like a hot bowl of oatmeal on a crisp fall day. Make it even better by turning it into apple crisp steel cut oatmeal with fresh apples and coconut sugar. The perfect healthy breakfast.

Dessert For Breakfast

I don’t always have time to bake apple crisp. But I do always have time to make apple crisp steel cut oatmeal.

Soak the oats in whole milk plain yogurt a day ahead to make them easier to digest. Then add freshly diced apples, a sprinkle of cinnamon and a bit of coconut sugar for a sweet breakfast treat. The coconut sugar adds a great maple flavor that pairs beautifully with the apples and cinnamon.

Don’t forget to top your oatmeal with your favorite granola (ours is kettle corn granola!) for that crunchy apple crisp topping.

Steel Cut Versus Rolled

Even if you are not a big oatmeal fan you have to give this a try. I grew up hating oatmeal. I wanted to like it so badly. But I couldn’t handle the texture.

Then I tried steel cut oats. What a world of difference! Once you try them you won’t want to go back to the rolled variety. Steel cut oats keep their texture and don’t get mushy.

There is nothing quite like a hot bowl of oatmeal on a crisp fall day. Make it even better by turning it into apple crisp steel cut oatmeal with fresh apples and coconut sugar.

All around apple crisp steel cut oatmeal is a great breakfast. It does take about fifteen minutes to cook. So if you are pressed for time on weekdays you can save it for a weekend treat. Or just cook a big batch at the start of the week and reheat it on the stove or in the oven for a quick breakfast.

Make It Your Own

My husband loves to eat his oatmeal with fresh, raw milk on top. My daughter likes a dollop of vanilla yogurt on hers. It’s almost as good as apple crisp with ice cream!

Are you in need of a delicious fall breakfast that the kids will love?

Grab some Bob’s Redmill steel cut oats and coconut sugar and Stonyfield plain whole milk yogurt. Then hit up your local orchard for your favorite variety of apple. You’re already half way to an amazing breakfast.

There is nothing quite like a hot bowl of oatmeal on a crisp fall day. Make it even better by turning it into apple crisp steel cut oatmeal with fresh apples and coconut sugar.

Apple Crisp Steel Cut Oatmeal
Yields 4
A hot breakfast of steel cut oats, sweet apples and coconut sugar.
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Ingredients
  1. 1 cup steel cut oats
  2. 1 cup warm water
  3. 1/2 cup whole milk plain yogurt
  4. 1 3/4 cups water
  5. 1/2 cup coconut sguar
  6. 1/2 cup peeled and diced apples
  7. 1/4 tsp. cinnamon
  8. pinch unrefined sea salt
  9. Optional toppings: milk, yogurt, granola, raisins, dried cranberries
Instructions
  1. In a small bowl combine the oats, 1 cup water and yogurt. Let sit 7 - 24 hours at room temperature.
  2. When ready to cook, combine the oat mixture, 1 3/4 cups water, coconut sugar, apples, cinnamon and salt in a medium sauce pan.
  3. Bring to a boil, reduce heat, and cook on low, stirring frequently, until the oats and apples are cooked, 15 - 20 minutes.
  4. Serve warm, plain or topped with milk or yogurt and granola.
Notes
  1. You can prepare the oatmeal in advance and store it in the refrigerator for up to a week. Reheat on the stove or in the oven with extra water added.
Just Take A Bite http://justtakeabite.com/

In order for me to support my blogging activities, I may receive monetary compensation or other types of remuneration for my endorsement, recommendation, testimonial and/or link to any products or services from this blog. It will not change the cost of any products or services for you.

Simple Honey Oat Bars | Just Take A Bite

Simple Honey Oat Bars

When little tummies are recovering from illness it’s best to keep food simple and skip a lot of fat and sugar. These honey oat bars come together easily and are gentle on the tummy.

Simple Honey Oat Bars | Just Take A Bite

Did I mention my son was sick? That seems to be an ongoing battle this winter. My poor boy that has such a sensitive digestive system.

He had the recent stomach virus that went around. But unlike most people that were over it in a day or two he struggled with it for a week. And he could hardly eat that whole time. He spent his days either on the couch or in the bathroom.

BRAT diet doesn’t exist here.

Add all of his allergies on top of trying to keep his diet bland and starchy and you’ve got a real challenge. No gluten, rice, corn, potatoes or bananas.

Simple Honey Oat Bars | Just Take A Bite

We decided to try oats. He basically lived on oatmeal for a week. And just when he thought he couldn’t handle another bowl of oatmeal I came up with these simple honey oat bars!

I wanted to keep them very low in fat to keep his tummy settled. So I used grass-fed gelatin in place of eggs. I also kept the sweetness low with just a touch of cane sugar and honey.

The combination of whole oats and ground oats helps the bars bind together.

Oats to the rescue.

My son loved them! And they kept him going. There was starch but also protein. Not to mention the gelatin was helpful for healing his upset tummy.

My daughter tried them too and thinks they’re great…even if she’s not sick. They make an easy, low sugar breakfast to keep stashed in the freezer for busy week days.

Get your oats soaking and whip up a batch or two of these simple honey oat bars. Always have some on hand to put upset bellies at ease.

Don’t forget to add activated charcoal to the diet as well to really stop the stomach upset.

What is your go-to food when recovering from a stomach virus?

Simple Honey Oat Bars | Just Take A Bite

Simple Honey Oat Bars
Yields 10
A simple, low fat oat bar that is perfect for settling little tummies after illness.
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Ingredients
  1. 1 cup oat flour (grind rolled oats in a blender)
  2. 1 cup rolled oats
  3. 1 cup warm water
  4. 2 Tbsp. lemon juice
  5. 2 tsp. grass-fed gelatin (NOT collagen)
  6. 1/4 cup hot water
  7. 1 Tbsp. organic cane sugar
  8. 3 Tbsp. honey
  9. 2 Tbsp. melted butter, coconut oil, lard or tallow
  10. 1/2 tsp. baking soda
  11. 1/2 tsp. unrefined sea salt
Instructions
  1. Combine the oat flour, oats, warm water and lemon juice. Cover and let sit for 7-24 hours (24 hours is best for oats).
  2. Heat oven to 350 degrees F. Grease or line with parchment paper an 8" square baking pan.
  3. Add the gelatin to the hot water and stir until dissolved.
  4. Add all of the ingredients to the soaked oats. Mix well.
  5. Spread in the prepared pan.
  6. Bake 35 minutes.
  7. Cool and cut into bars.
  8. Store in a covered container for up to a week at room temperature, two weeks in the refrigerator or one year in the freezer.
Just Take A Bite http://justtakeabite.com/
 In order for me to support my blogging activities, I may receive monetary compensation or other types of remuneration for my endorsement, recommendation, testimonial and/or link to any products or services from this blog. It will not change the cost of any products or services for you.

This post is linked to Savoring Saturdays.

In order for me to support my blogging activities, I may receive monetary compensation or other types of remuneration for my endorsement, recommendation, testimonial and/or link to any products or services from this blog. It will not change the cost of any products or services for you.

Sunbutter Breakfast Cookies | Just Take A Bite

Gluten Free Sunbutter Breakfast Cookies

In need of an allergy free easy breakfast? These sunbutter breakfast cookies only take a few minutes of prep time and are free of gluten, dairy, eggs, nuts, rice, corn, soy and coconut.

Sunbutter Breakfast Cookies | Just Take A Bite

When I ask my kids what they want for breakfast nine times out of ten they say breakfast cookies.

I don’t blame them.

Who doesn’t want a cookie for breakfast?!

I’ve been making a variety of breakfast cookies for years. But recently we experimented with an egg free diet for my oldest. So I had to come up with yet another version.

Sunbutter makes a great allergen friendly substitute for eggs. Not to mention it is delicious! It also replaces the fat. So there is no need to use dairy or coconut.

I also add some ground flax seeds to make sure the cookies hold together.

Sunbutter Breakfast Cookies | Just Take A Bite

Start them the right way.

Sunbutter breakfast cookies start with a long soak to reduce the phytic acid content. This is especially important when using oats as they are very high in phytic acid.

If you’ve never soaked your grains before rest assured it’s a very simple thing to do. Mix the grains with water and lemon juice. Done.

When you are ready to bake all you have to do is add the remaining ingredients, mix, scoop and bake.

Get the kids in the kitchen.

This is a great recipe to let little ones help with. No chopping. No egg cracking. No butter melting. Just measure, pour and mix.

They can even sample the ingredients as you go. Somebody has to make sure the honey tastes good, right?!

You can add whatever extras you like to sunbutter breakfast cookies. My kids always ask for mini chocolate chips. Dried fruit, nuts, seeds and coconut all work, depending on your dietary needs.

Sunbutter Breakfast Cookies | Just Take A Bite

Add a fall twist.

For fall you could even add a touch of pureed pumpkin and ground cinnamon. Or some diced apples and cinnamon would be fun too.

Are you looking for an allergen friendly breakfast treat for your family? Sunbutter breakfast cookies will be a family favorite.

Stock up.

Be sure to make a big batch so you can stock the freezer for effortless breakfasts on busy school mornings. Or add them to lunch boxes for a delicious and healthy treat.

I have to share a fun fact that I learned while making these.

When you mix a lot of baking soda with sunbutter it turns green!

Don’t worry. I adjusted the recipe so you won’t have green cookies like we did. But it is perfectly safe to eat them even if they are green.

Sunbutter Breakfast Cookies | Just Take A Bite

Gluten Free Sunbutter Breakfast Cookies
Yields 20
A simple breakfast cookies that is free of gluten, eggs, dairy, nuts, rice, corn and coconut.
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Ingredients
  1. 2 1/2 cups gf oats
  2. 1/2 cup sorghum flour (or brown rice or amaranth)
  3. 3/4 cups warm water
  4. 2 Tbsp. lemon juice
  5. 1/2 cup sunbutter
  6. 2/3 cup honey
  7. 1/2 tsp. unrefined sea salt
  8. 1/2 tsp. baking soda
  9. 1/4 cup ground flax seeds
  10. 1/2 cup add-ins: chocolate chips, dried fruit, coconut, seeds, nuts
Instructions
  1. Combine the oats, sorghum, water and lemon juice in a bowl. Cover and let sit 24 hours.
  2. Heat the oven to 350*F. Line two baking sheets with parchment paper.
  3. Add the honey, salt, soda and flax seeds to the oat mixture. Mix well.
  4. Stir in the add-ins.
  5. Scoop mounds onto the prepared baking sheet (as large or as small as you like).
  6. Bake for 15 - 20 minutes (less time for smaller cookies, more time for larger cookies).
  7. Let cool.
  8. Store in sealed container in the refrigerator for up to a week or in the freezer for up to a year.
Just Take A Bite http://justtakeabite.com/

In order for me to support my blogging activities, I may receive monetary compensation or other types of remuneration for my endorsement, recommendation, testimonial and/or link to any products or services from this blog. It will not change the cost of any products or services for  you.

This post is linked to Savoring Saturdays.

In order for me to support my blogging activities, I may receive monetary compensation or other types of remuneration for my endorsement, recommendation, testimonial and/or link to any products or services from this blog. It will not change the cost of any products or services for you.

Peaches and Cream Overnight Oats | Homemade Dutch Apple Pie

Peaches and Cream Overnight Oats

Peaches and cream overnight oats make a satisfying breakfast. Prepared in advance, they are a grab ‘n’ go breakfast everyone will love. Use fresh peaches in the summer and frozen or canned peaches in the winter.

Peaches and Cream Overnight Oats | Homemade Dutch Apple Pie

I try my best to do breakfast preparation in advance. In the morning I want everything ready to go.

When my husband is getting ready for work…breakfast is ready.

When one kid wakes up early and is instantly begging for food…breakfast is ready.

When the baby needs to nurse and everyone else is hungry…breakfast is ready.

Since we don’t eat store-bought cereal I need other quick and easy breakfasts that are ready for the family even if I’m busy.

Peaches and cream overnight oats are the perfect solution.

Peaches and Cream Overnight Oats | Homemade Dutch Apple Pie

Simple, simple, simple.

It only takes about five minutes to prepare overnight oats. I line up jars for however many servings I’m going to make. Then just add the ingredients to each jar and mix.

Peaches and cream overnight oats only contain five ingredients. All of them except for the peaches are pantry and refrigerator staples. So you can whip up a batch just about any time.

Give them a boost.

In addition the five base ingredients you can add collagen for protein and egg yolk for vitamins. This will make peaches and cream overnight oats a very balanced breakfast. That includes three components:

  1. Proteinyogurt, collagen, egg yolk
  2. Carbohydrates – oats, peaches, maple syrup
  3. Fat – whole milk yogurt or coconut yogurt

One other thing I love is that the overnight soaking makes the oats much better for you!

Peaches and Cream Overnight Oats | Homemade Dutch Apple Pie

Get ready to host.

These overnight oats are great for the whole family on a school day morning. But that’s not all.

Peaches and cream overnight oats are fancy enough for hosting overnight guests or a brunch. Mix up a bunch of small jars of the oats and leave the peaches on top. They look so elegant. Plus you can just pull them out of the fridge in the morning and have time to visit with your guests. No cooking necessary.

Change it up.

If you aren’t a fan of peaches in your yogurt or you just don’t have any on hand you can swap another fruit. Stone fruits like plums, apricots and nectarines work very well.

Or you can use berries and cherries. They can be fresh or go right from the freezer to the oat mixture. By morning they will be thawed and ready to go!

No matter what flavor you choose overnight oats are a perfect prep ahead breakfast.  You can make them for a busy weekday morning or even make a batch while you enjoy some end of summer travel.  All of the ingredients are available wherever you go.

On the go.

Peaches and cream overnight oats are also great for school lunches and snacks.  Just mix it up the night before.  Put a lid on and pack it in the lunch box.  It is ready to go when your child is ready to eat.

By using gluten free oats this breakfast is not only delicious but also gluten, egg, nut, corn, soy and rice free. If you use coconut yogurt it is also dairy free. There is a version for just about everyone!

In need of an easy breakfast?  Peaches and cream overnight oats are the way to go!

Peaches and Cream Overnight Oats | Homemade Dutch Apple Pie

Peaches and Cream Overnight Oats
Serves 2
Peaches and cream overnight oats make a satisfying breakfast. Prepared in advance with fresh peaches, they are a grab 'n' go breakfast everyone will love.
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Ingredients
  1. 1 cup old fashioned oats (be sure to get gluten free oats if you are gluten free)
  2. 1 cup plain whole milk yogurt or coconut yogurt
  3. 4 Tbsp. maple syrup (adjust to your liking)
  4. 1/4 tsp. unrefined sea salt
  5. 1 large peach, peeled and cut up (over oats)
  6. optional - 2 tsp. collagen, 1 egg yolk
Instructions
  1. Divide the oats, yogurt, maple syrup and salt (and collagen and egg yolk if desired) between two small jars or dishes. Mix well.
  2. Cut up the peaches over the jars so the juice drips into the jars.
  3. Cover and refrigerate 7-24 hours.
  4. Stir in peaches when ready to eat.
Just Take A Bite http://justtakeabite.com/

In order for me to support my blogging activities, I may receive monetary compensation or other types of remuneration for my endorsement, recommendation, testimonial and/or link to any products or services from this blog.

In order for me to support my blogging activities, I may receive monetary compensation or other types of remuneration for my endorsement, recommendation, testimonial and/or link to any products or services from this blog. It will not change the cost of any products or services for you.

Blender To Oven Maple Cherry Baked Oatmeal | Homemade Dutch Apple Pie

Blender To Oven Maple Cherry Baked Oatmeal

Maple cherry baked oatmeal is a simple way to use fresh fruit and soaked grains for a quick prep breakfast.  Toss the ingredients in the blender and bake.

Blender To Oven Maple Cherry Baked Oatmeal | Homemade Dutch Apple Pie

During the hottest days of the summer the last thing you want to do is spend a half hour in the kitchen baking.

That doesn’t mean you want to eat cold cereal for breakfast every morning.

The solution?

Soak some oats.  Grab your blender.  And you are already half way to a great breakfast.

Maple cherry baked oatmeal is so simple to make.  All of the ingredients go into the blender.  Then simply pour the batter into a baking dish and your work is done.

Change the texture.

I’ve mentioned before that my oldest has problems with certain textures.  One of the foods she struggles with most is oats.

Crunchy granola?  Fine.  Oatmeal?  No way!  One bite and she has had enough.  She practically gags on it.

My solution is to blend the oats.

Then baked oatmeal tastes more like cake!  She loved this.

Blender To Oven Maple Cherry Baked Oatmeal | Homemade Dutch Apple Pie

Cherries add sweetness.

The combination of sweet cherries and maple syrup is perfect.  You get a burst of flavor and natural sweetness.

You can do almost all of the preparation for this maple cherry baked oatmeal in advance.  Soak the oats the morning before to reduce the phytic acid content.  The night before pit your cherries.

Then in the morning all you have to do is put everything in the blender and bake.  Freshly baked breakfast will be waiting for you when you are finished getting everyone ready for the day.

An added bonus is that you do your baking before it gets too hot.  If you have a toaster oven that is a great solution too!

What about allergens?

If you are gluten free be sure to buy gluten free oats.  There is one egg in maple cherry baked oatmeal.  It can be replaced with gelatin or flax eggs.

Any type of fat you tolerate can be used in this baked oatmeal.

If you are like me and don’t tolerate oats, simply replace the oats with another gluten free grain like brown rice or amaranth.   You’ll never know the difference!

Blender To Oven Maple Cherry Baked Oatmeal | Homemade Dutch Apple Pie

Blender To Oven Maple Cherry Baked Oatmeal
Serves 12
Maple cherry baked oatmeal is a simple way to use fresh fruit and soaked grains for a quick prep breakfast. Toss the ingredients in the blender and bake.
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Ingredients
  1. 2 1/2 cups oats
  2. 1/2 cup sorghum flour (or brown rice, white rice or amaranth)
  3. 1 1/2 cups warm water
  4. 1 Tbsp. lemon juice
  5. 1 egg
  6. 1/3 cup maple syrup
  7. 1/3 cup organic cane sugar or coconut sugar
  8. 1/2 tsp. unrefined sea salt
  9. 1 tsp. baking soda
  10. 1 tsp. organic vanilla
  11. 3 Tbsp. liquid fat (olive oil, avocado oil, melted butter, coconut oil, lard or tallow)
  12. 1 cup pitted sweet cherries (20 - 25 cherries)
  13. Optional add-ins: chopped nuts, dried fruit, fresh fruit, chocolate chips, coconut flakes, seeds
Instructions
  1. Combine the oats, flour, water and lemon juice. Let sit 24 hours.
  2. Heat the oven to 350*F. Grease a 7x11 baking pan.
  3. Add the soaked oats and the remaining ingredients to a blender.
  4. Blend until pureed.
  5. Pour the pureed mixture into the prepared pan.
  6. Stir in any optional add-ins.
  7. Bake 1 hour.
  8. Let oatmeal cool 10 minutes before serving.
  9. Serve plain, topped with butter, with milk or yogurt.
  10. Store in a sealed container at room temperature for up to 3 days, in the refrigerator for up to a week or in the freezer for up to 9 months.
Notes
  1. Some or all of the oats can be replaced with brown rice flour or amaranth flour.
Just Take A Bite http://justtakeabite.com/

Breakfast is served.

Both of my big kids loved this baked oatmeal.  No texture issues at all.

I bumped up the nutrition factor by spreading lots of butter on top, as if it was a muffin.

Maple cherry baked oatmeal can also be served with milk poured on top or whole milk yogurt.  I thought it tasted great plain, sprinkled with a bit of sea salt to support my adrenals (until my baby girl got horrible reflux and I couldn’t eat any more of it.  If you have reflux use caution.  Oats can be problematic).

This makes a great breakfast year round.  Use cherries from your freezer stash to make a batch of maple cherry baked oatmeal during the winter.  You’ll have a healthy and delicious breakfast all week long.

You can also make a double batch and stock your freezer for easy school morning breakfasts.  It makes a simple addition to school lunches as well.  It can be eaten like a muffin.  What kid wouldn’t love a bowl of chicken noodle soup and baked oatmeal packed in their lunch?!

No cherries left?

No problem.  Try blueberries!  Or any fruit you like.

Make maple cherry baked oatmeal an extra special breakfast by stirring in chopped nuts, dried fruit, cut up fresh fruit or chocolate chips after you pour the batter in the pan.

Try some maple cherry baked oatmeal this summer.  Then enjoy it all winter using your frozen fruit.  Pair it with a protein like eggs or bacon and add some healthy fat like butter or yogurt.  You’ve got the perfect breakfast your kids will love.

Are you an oatmeal fan or does the texture bother you?  Have you tried it with the oats pureed?

Blender To Oven Maple Cherry Baked Oatmeal | Homemade Dutch Apple Pie

In order for me to support my blogging activities, I may receive monetary compensation or other types of remuneration for my endorsement, recommendation, testimonial and/or link to any products or services from this blog.

This post is linked to Savoring Saturdays.

In order for me to support my blogging activities, I may receive monetary compensation or other types of remuneration for my endorsement, recommendation, testimonial and/or link to any products or services from this blog. It will not change the cost of any products or services for you.

Apple Pie Breakfast Parfait | Homemade Dutch Apple Pie

Apple Pie Breakfast Parfait

This apple pie breakfast parfait is a simple layered breakfast that is easy enough for kids to make and fancy enough for guests.
Apple Pie Breakfast Parfait | Homemade Dutch Apple PieSaturday mornings I like to make fun breakfasts and often let my kids choose what we have.  That usually includes things like:

But sometimes by Friday I just don’t have the energy or time to measure and soak flour and get things ready for baking.  I need a simple breakfast that is still fun and delicious.

Enter the apple pie breakfast parfait!  It is so easy to make that your kids can almost do it by themselves.  But what’s even better about it is the taste.Apple Pie Breakfast Parfait | Homemade Dutch Apple Pie

Both of my big kids said it really tastes like apple pie.  Then they proceeded to devour it!

There is no refined sugar (unless it is added to your granola).  Apple pie breakfast parfait has a good balance of protein and fat from the yogurt and carbohydrates from the apples and granola.  There is even some sea salt for balance if you use this kettle corn granola!

Don’t think this is just for kids, though!

Apple pie breakfast parfait looks so pretty and tastes so great it is perfect for entertaining house guests.

I would even make mini versions to serve at a brunch, whether for a playdate or a party.

I prepare the apple filling the night before so it can cool completely.  Then in the morning I just layer the ingredients before breakfast.  This would be a great thing for kids to do on their own or if they have friends over – build your own apple pie parfait!Apple Pie Breakfast Parfait | Homemade Dutch Apple Pie

This breakfast is very allergen friendly, being gluten, nut, corn, soy and egg free.  If you are dairy free you can use coconut milk yogurt.

Apple pie breakfast parfait is also a perfect breakfast for the summer when you want something easy and cold.  You can prepare it in advance or assemble it in the morning.

Are you in a breakfast rut?  Try an apple pie breakfast parfait.  Your kids will love it.  You will too!

Apple Pie Breakfast Parfait | Homemade Dutch Apple Pie

Apple Pie Breakfast Parfait
Yields 4
A simple, yet elegant breakfast parfait made with real ingredients and very allergen friendly.
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Ingredients
  1. 3 medium apples, peeled, cored and cut into small chunks
  2. 1/2 tsp. cinnamon
  3. 3 Tbsp. honey, maple syrup, coconut sugar or cane sugar
  4. 1 - 1 1/2 cups whole milk yogurt or coconut milk yogurt
  5. 1 cup prepared granola
Instructions
  1. Heat oven to 350*F.
  2. Combine the apples, cinnamon and sugar in a small baking dish.
  3. Bake 40 minutes. Stir.
  4. Cover and refrigerate over night.
  5. Layer the yogurt, apples and granola in four dishes.
Just Take A Bite http://justtakeabite.com/
In order for me to support my blogging activities, I may receive monetary compensation or other types of remuneration for my endorsement, recommendation, testimonial and/or link to any products or services from this blog.

In order for me to support my blogging activities, I may receive monetary compensation or other types of remuneration for my endorsement, recommendation, testimonial and/or link to any products or services from this blog. It will not change the cost of any products or services for you.

Homemade Oat Milk

Homemade Oat Milk {fermented option}

Homemade Oat Milk | Homemade Dutch Apple Pie

I am a huge fan of raw milk.  I’d drink it by the glass full if I could right now.  But my little one would be in a lot of pain if I did.

Being dairy free is a big adjustment.  But it’s nothing new to us.  We entered the world of no dairy and alternative milks over a year ago for my son.

At that time he was also allergic to nuts and rice.  So that eliminates a lot of options.

We tried different versions of coconut milk.  That was a big no.  I can’t blame him – coconut milk tastes nothing like dairy milk.  Even I can’t drink that plain.

Finally I found oat milk – something he didn’t mind drinking.  Something I could use in cooking and baking that would be safe for him.

But oat milk is definitely not cheap.  We usually pay about $3.50 for each small box.

Recently I was reading through Nourishing Traditions and saw a recipe for rice milk with an option to use oats.  I had to try it immediately!

Homemade Oat Milk | Homemade Dutch Apple Pie

First I made a fermented version.  I figured it would be the healthiest option if my son would drink it.  But it didn’t go over very well.

So I modified it a bit and made an unfermented version.  Success!

Let me tell you this is SO much cheaper than buying oat milk.  A quarter cup of oats makes over four cups of milk!  Not only that I like that I can make sure the oats are properly prepared since oats are very high in phytic acid.

If you want to boost the nutrition factor a little you can add vitamin D drops.  You could probably add a calcium powder as well (though I have not tried that) (check with your NP for quality sources of these supplements).

I may be in the minority, but I am not a big fan of nut milks.  I don’t think anyone needs to consume that kind of quantity of nuts on a regular basis.  They do contain quite a bit of omega-6’s, which we get more than enough of.

So I’m happy to have a safe alternative to dairy that my son enjoys and doesn’t cost a ton.  It is also extremely easy to make (just cook oats and puree).

The other benefit of having alternative milks is to make sure you get variety in your diet.  This is very important when dealing with allergies.  Rotating milk sources can help prevent future allergies or sensitivities.

Oat milk works very well for baking.  I even use it in cream soups and stews. It has a very neutral flavor.

As I mentioned you can make it into a fermented drink to boost nutrition.  If you are used to ferments you can give that a try.  If you are making it for kids that might have a more sensitive palate try it without fermenting.

Are you dairy free?  Are you looking for a unique milk substitute?  Try homemade oat milk.  It’s a mildly sweet, satisfying drink.

Be sure to stay tuned – I’ve got a couple more alternative drinks coming your way!

Homemade Oat Milk | Homemade Dutch Apple Pie 

Homemade Oat Milk {fermented option}
A simple beverage made from oats.
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Ingredients
  1. 1/4 cup old fashioned oats
  2. 1 cup warm water
  3. 4 cups water, divided
  4. 4 Tbsp. coconut sugar, honey or maple syrup (optional)
  5. 1/4 tsp. sea salt (optional)
  6. vitamin D drops (optional)
  7. 2 Tbsp. whey (optional)
Instructions
  1. Soak the oats in 1 cup warm water for 24 hours.
  2. Combine the soaked oats and 3 cups water in a medium saucepan.
  3. Bring to a boil and simmer, covered, 2 hours.
  4. Pour the oats and water into a blender.
  5. Proceed with the non-fermented or fermented version from this point.
Non-fermented method
  1. Add the salt and sugar.
  2. Blend well.
  3. Pour into a jar and add another 1 cup water.
  4. Refrigerate.
  5. Add a few drops of Vitamin D (optional).
  6. Shake before pouring.
  7. Add extra water if milk is too thick for your taste.
Fermented method
  1. Blend the oats and water.
  2. Pour into a jar.
  3. Add the whey and 1/2 tsp. sea salt.
  4. Cover and let sit at room temperature for 3 days.
  5. Stir in sweetener and 1 cup extra water.
  6. Add vitamin D if desired.
  7. Store in the refrigerator.
  8. Shake well before serving.
Notes
  1. This recipe easily doubles to make a half gallon of oat milk.
  2. This milk should not be used for children under the age of one since they don't have the enzymes to digest grains.
  3. This makes about 5 cups of milk.
  4. You can add extra water to the milk to thin it out.
Just Take A Bite http://justtakeabite.com/

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Simple Soaked Series: Crunchy Granola Bars

Simple Soaked Series: Crunchy Granola Bars | Homemade Dutch Apple PieNext up in my simple soaked series is a staple in my house – granola bars!  These are definitely a family favorite.

One batch of granola bars makes a big batch so you can stock the freezer for easy breakfasts and snacks.  The really great thing about them is that you don’t even have to thaw them!  Just grab one out of the freezer and start eating.

I’ve made many different versions of granola bars over the years.  But I haven’t always prepared them the right way.

This version of granola bars uses soaked oats to reduce phytic acid content and make them easier on your tummy.  The oats are first soaked and dried.  You’ll have to do this step in advance, so plan ahead.  Then all you have to do is mix and bake.  Homemade granola bars are so easy to make.

They are also very budget friendly!  No need to pay for a box.  Just make your own granola bars for a fraction of the cost…and get sixteen at a time instead of six.  Making your own also means you decide on the flavor.  Add any dried fruit, nuts, seeds and chocolate chips you like.

Simple Soaked Series: Crunchy Granola Bars | Homemade Dutch Apple PieThe other unique thing about this recipe is that it makes crunchy granola bars.  I grew up eating crunchy granola bars (anybody else remember the green package of the oats and honey flavor?).  I’ve always like them better than chewy.

But most homemade granola bar recipes make chewy bars.  So I’ve created a crunchy version.  My kids like this better than chewy as well.  Making crunchy granola bars also means you don’t have to use any eggs.  So they are naturally gluten, egg and nut free!  They can also be made dairy free.

Soaked crunchy granola bars hold up really well.  There is no need to refrigerate them to make them stay together.  You can easily pack them in a lunch or even toss them in a diaper bag when you’re on the go.

I like to make a big batch and wrap them individually.  I store them in the freezer and take individual bars out as needed.

A crunchy granola bar pairs well with whole yogurt drizzled with honey, fruity yogurt, eggs or even a handful of crispy nuts.  Add a piece of fruit and you’ve got a balanced, nutritious, ready in minutes breakfast.

Are you a crunchy or chewy granola bar lover?  Give this crunchy granola bar a try.  Your whole family will love it.

If you like granola bars but don’t tolerate oats, stay tuned…I’ve got another great breakfast bar coming your way!

Simple Soaked Series: Crunchy Granola Bars | Homemade Dutch Apple Pie 

Simple Soaked Series: Crunchy Granola Bars
Yields 16
A crunchy granola bar made with soaked oats.
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Ingredients
  1. 3 cups rolled oats
  2. 1 1/2 cups warm water + 2 Tbsp. lemon juice, yogurt, whey or kefir
  3. 1/2 cup shredded coconut
  4. 1/2 cup ground flax seeds
  5. 6 Tbsp. butter or coconut oil
  6. 1/3 cup honey
  7. 1/3 cup maple syrup
  8. 1/2 cup coconut sugar or cane sugar
  9. 1/2 tsp. unrefined sea salt
  10. optional: 1/2 cup dried fruit, chopped nuts, seeds or chocolate chips; 1 tsp. cinnamon
Instructions
  1. Combine the oats and the soaking liquid.
  2. Cover and let sit 24 hours.
  3. Rinse and drain the oats.
  4. Spread the soaked oats on a dehydrator tray and dry for 8 hours (this can also be done in an oven at the lowest heat setting)
  5. Allow the dried oats to cool.
  6. Heat the oven to 325*F. Grease a 9x13 pan.
  7. Crumble the dried oats into a large bowl.
  8. Add the coconut, flax seeds, sugar and salt to the oats. Gently mix.
  9. Heat the butter, honey and syrup in a small saucepan until melted and combined.
  10. Add the butter mixture to the oat mixture. Mix well.
  11. Add any optional add-ins.
  12. Spread the mixture into the prepared pan.
  13. Bake for 30 minutes.
  14. Allow to cool for 10 minutes. Cut into bars.
  15. Allow to cool completely before removing the bars from the pan.
  16. Store in an airtight container.
Notes
  1. The granola bars can be kept in the refrigerator to stay fresh longer. They can also be stored in the freezer for long term storage. There is no need to thaw granola bars.
Just Take A Bite http://justtakeabite.com/

In order for me to support my blogging activities, I may receive monetary compensation or other types of remuneration for my endorsement, recommendation, testimonial and/or link to any products or services from this blog. It will not change the cost of any products or services for you.

Basic Grains: Oatmeal

Basic Grains: Oatmeal | Homemade Dutch Apple PieWhen it comes to grains it doesn’t get more basic than oatmeal.  It is a breakfast staple for so many.

But oatmeal may be one of the things causing digestive distress and vitamin and mineral deficiencies for many.  This is especially true if your oatmeal comes from a packet with flavorings or if you eat granola out of a box.  They don’t have any nutrients to begin with.

But even if you cook plain oats you’re likely to have problems.  Ever feel gassy, bloated or really full after eating oatmeal?  There’s a reason.

Oats are one of the highest phytic acid containing grains.  So if you are not preparing them properly oats are really hard on your body and do more harm than good.

I learned this the hard way.  I used to eat store-bought granola every single day…for years.  As you can  imagine I also had years of digestive problems.  Now I don’t tolerate oats at all, even properly prepared.

That being said, oats are a very budget-friendly and healthy breakfast if you take the time to soak them.  Honestly, oatmeal is one of the easiest breakfasts to make.  You soak the oats one morning.  Then the next morning they cook in five minutes!Basic Grains: Oatmeal | Homemade Dutch Apple Pie 3

I love that you can add so many things to a bowl of oatmeal to bump up the nutrition:

  • butter
  • coconut oil
  • raw milk or cream
  • coconut milk
  • yogurt
  • gelatin
  • cinnamon
  • fresh fruit
  • dried fruit
  • nuts
  • flax seeds
  • nut butter

You can even add probiotics and cod liver oil!

You can make a big pot of oatmeal one morning that will last all week.  Then all you have to do is warm it and add new flavors.  You can create all sorts of fun combinations like peanut butter banana, cinnamon raisin, strawberries and cream and chocolate chip!

My three year old loves oatmeal.  It’s a special treat for him when I make it.  He always claims any leftovers.  My six year old, on the other hand, can’t do oatmeal.  The texture is too much for her oral sensory issues.  She does love granola and granola bars, though.  Experiment and see what your kids think.  You can adjust the liquid content to give it a different texture.  Adding extra milk or water makes it more like cereal and not so thick.

Oatmeal for breakfast is great for filling bellies and giving a healthy dose of carbohydrates for energy at the start of the day.  Add the nutrient dense components and pair it with some eggs or bacon and you’ve got a powerhouse breakfast.  It’s even gluten free.

If you’re like me and don’t tolerate oats you can replace oats with teff, rice or quiona.

Have you been eating your oatmeal without soaking it for years?  Now’s the time to get started preparing it the right way and get the most out of your oats.Basic Grains: Oatmeal | Homemade Dutch Apple Pie 2

 

Basic Grains: Oatmeal
Serves 2
Basic soaked oatmeal.
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Ingredients
  1. 1 cup oats (old fashioned/rolled oats)
  2. 1 cup warm water + 2 Tbsp. lemon juice, kefir, yogurt or whey
  3. 1 cup water
  4. 1/2 tsp. sea salt
  5. 2-4 Tbsp. coconut sugar, maple syrup or honey (optional)
  6. gelatin, cinnamon, dried fruit, fresh fruit, nuts, seeds, butter, coconut oil, yogurt, milk to taste
Instructions
  1. Combine the oats and warm water plus lemon juice in a bowl. Cover and let sit for 24 hours (or longer).
  2. Put soaked oats in a medium saucepan.
  3. Add the water, salt and sweetener.
  4. Cook over medium heat about five minutes, until liquid is absorbed and oats are cooked through.
  5. Add optional ingredients to pot or to individual bowls.
  6. Store leftovers in a sealed container in the refrigerator.
Notes
  1. To reheat leftover oatmeal place it in a saucepan with a small amount of milk or water and heat until warm.
Just Take A Bite http://justtakeabite.com/


In order for me to support my blogging activities, I may receive monetary compensation or other types of remuneration for my endorsement, recommendation, testimonial and/or link to any products or services from this blog.

In order for me to support my blogging activities, I may receive monetary compensation or other types of remuneration for my endorsement, recommendation, testimonial and/or link to any products or services from this blog. It will not change the cost of any products or services for you.

The Hows and Whys of Preparing Grains

The Hows and Whys of Grains | Homemade Dutch Apple PieOne of my goals this year is to get back on track with properly preparing my grains.  I’ve been doing it for years now, but got off track with pregnancy and a new baby.

Some may say to just avoid grains.  But I tried that and learned that my body needs them!  The most unhealthy I’ve ever been was when I went grain free.  Grains can be a very healthy part of a real food, traditional diet.  Even Nourishing Traditions and GAPS mention the benefit of properly prepared grains.

So to help us all get to where we need to be I’m sharing some information about why you need to treat your grains in a special way if you are going to consume them and how it’s done.  I actually wrote most of this a couple years ago!  But never shared it here.  It’s a good reminder for myself.  Hopefully it’s a great starting point or reminder for you as well.

In the weeks following this introduction I’ve got some basics and some fun recipes coming that all involve properly prepared grains.  I hope you enjoy!

One of the oddest and most confusing aspects of real food is the idea of soaking grains.  Switching to butter instead of margarine?  No problem.  Drinking raw milk instead of pasteurized?  You bet.  Using honey instead of corn syrup?  Done.  Get your flour wet before using it?  Say that again?  Wet flour?  How could that work?  And why would you want to?  But if you understand why you might find yourself turning your favorite baked goods into healthier soaked versions. The Hows and Whys of Grains | Homemade Dutch Apple Pie

It turns out there is actually a good reason to soak grains. Little things called phytates. Grains contain anti-nutrients as a protective mechanism.  This protects them from weather and animals.  But it also makes them difficult to digest.  Your digestive juices are enemies of the grains just like any external enemy.  Grains also have compounds that prevent active enzyme activity in your digestive system. This puts stress on your pancreas. 

In the unsoaked state grains contain phytates, which makes the minerals in the grains unavailable to you.  This can lead to mineral deficiencies and poor bone density (one more thing I learned the hard way when I found out I have seven cavities!). Both enzyme inhibitors and phytic acid can be mostly neutralized by soaking the grains. This makes them easier to digest and makes the nutrients available to your body. This process also begins to pre-digest the grains, breaking down complex starches and tannins that can irritate your stomach, as well as beginning to break down proteins like gluten.The Hows and Whys of Grains | Homemade Dutch Apple Pie

So without soaking the grains they are very difficult to digest and are actually harmful to your body.  This holds true for gluten-containing grains like wheat and rye but also for alternative grains like oats, amaranth and teff.  In fact oats, such a dietary staple for so many, has the highest phytate content of any grains!

Grains that are not properly prepared are harmful.  So how do you make them healthy? It’s not as hard as you might think. And, honestly, soaking often makes baking easier! It breaks up the process into very short steps that only take a few minutes here and there. The main thing you have to be willing to do is plan ahead. Soaking does take time. So if you want soaked pancakes in the morning, you have to plan and get them started the day before.The Hows and Whys of Grains | Homemade Dutch Apple Pie

The basic idea is that you use cultured dairy or another acid medium like lemon juice to soak the grains for at least 7 hours (ideally 24 hours) before using them.  The length of time required will depend on the grain.

The easiest way to start is by using recipes that give exact instructions on what ingredients to use, how much and how long. Once you get the hang of it you can start experimenting.  Simply replace the liquid in the recipe with a cultured/acidic medium (kefir, buttermilk, yogurt or warm water mixed with lemon juice), mix it with the grains, cover the bowl and let it sit.  Then proceed with the recipe after the grains have soaked.  You can also add the fat/oil during the soaking step.

Soaking can be used on all kinds of grains…wheat, oats, rice, etc. It is also used for lentils, beans and nuts.  There are a few exceptions to the rule.  Coconut flour, white rice, millet and flax seed are relatively low in phytic acid.  Although soaking them will still be beneficial it is not as critical.

Although millet is low in phytic acid, it is goitrogenic.  So limit your  millet intake if you have thyroid problems.

So what do you do if you don’t have time to soak your flour before baking, or what if you forgot to plan ahead? An alternative is to sprout the grains.  This is helpful for those times you have to do some last minute baking. Simply sprout the grains, dry them and grind them into flour. Then the phytates are already neutralized and you don’t have to soak it.  You can buy sprouted grains if you do not want to make your own.The Hows and Whys of Grains | Homemade Dutch Apple Pie

A third option for dealing with phytates is sourdough. Sourdough also breaks down the phytates and makes the grains easier to digest. Sourdough can be used for all kinds of baked goods.  If you want bread, sourdough is the way to go.

Soaking grains is a critical step in the baking process if you are not using sprouted grains or a sourdough starter.  It is important for aiding digestion for everyone.  It is especially crucial for anyone with a leaky gut, food allergies or food intolerances.  Even if you avoid some of the common grains like wheat and corn, you still have to properly prepare your food.  If you have cut gluten out of your diet but have not noticed any improvement, try soaking the gluten free grains you eat. 

Some alternative grains and flours are teff, amaranth, tapicoa, millet, rice (white and brown), quinoa, coconut, hemp and garbanzo bean.  These can be prepared in the same manner as their traditional counterparts. The Hows and Whys of Grains | Homemade Dutch Apple Pie

The next time you start baking ask yourself one question: “Is my flour wet?”  If it is you’re on your way to a tasty treat that will be easier on your gut and provide your body with important vitamins and minerals.

Do you consume grains?  What is your favorite way to prepare them?

In order for me to support my blogging activities, I may receive monetary compensation or other types of remuneration for my endorsement, recommendation, testimonial and/or link to any products or services from this blog. It will not change the cost of any products or services for you.